A Synerdisciplinary Music Therapy Treatment Team Approach for Hospice and Palliative Care

Australian Journal of Music Therapy, Annual 2004 | Go to article overview

A Synerdisciplinary Music Therapy Treatment Team Approach for Hospice and Palliative Care


Abstract

The role of the clinician on the multi-dimensional palliative care treatment team continues to evolve, expand, and be re-defined as patients and families are successfully served in and by music therapy. The terms interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary are often used to describe such inclusive treatment teams. A new term, synerdisciplinary, is offered, which builds and expands on previous terms. The stimulus for using this new term comes from the author's personal and professional experiences working as a clinician in hospice and palliative care. The related term synergetic is also considered as it relates to music therapy teams themselves within hospice and palliative care organizations. In this case, it refers to music therapists working together as a department with differing but complementary treatment approaches, philosophies, and orientations to their work in palliative and hospice music therapy.

Key Words: music therapy; hospice; palliative; treatment team

Introduction

The provision of services by a multi-faceted treatment team for the patient with a life-limiting illness or condition is a fundamental tenet of hospice and palliative care (Saunders, 1990). The inclusion of music therapy in complementing this treatment team has been increasingly accepted and progressively embraced in recent years in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Australia, Europe, and New Zealand (Aldridge, 1987,2003; Brooks & O'Rourke, 2002; Croxson & Krout, 2002; Haghighi & Pansch, 2000; Hilliard, 1995,2001,2003; Hogan, 2002; Krout, 2000, 2001,2002,2003; Lucchese & Krout, 2000; Mandel, 1993; O'Callaghan, 2003; O'Kelly, 2002; Porchet-Munro, 1998). In her landmark book, Munro

(1984) described such team work, stating "a music therapist could not function in the ways described in this book unless he or she were part of a multidisciplinary team, sharing in the complex care of the terminally ill person" (p. 62).

There are several terms that are frequently used to describe these treatment teams. I began researching this area five years after beginning my work as a music therapist as a member of such teams in palliative and hospice settings, concluding that the existing terms may not be entirely adequate. It is my own experiences and a review of the literature which have stimulated me to propose new terms. First I will examine the descriptors in current use in the literature.

The Multidisciplinary, Interdisciplinary, and Transdisciplinary Treatment Team

Teams are often described as being multidisciplinary when professionals from different disciplines provide their own treatments for the common good of the patient without necessarily meeting together to plan or discuss their needs and progress. The disciplines involved in the team may be diverse and include physicians, nurses and nurse assistants, social workers, physiotherapists, pastoral counsellors, and volunteers. Areas such as music, art, and drama therapy, massage, acupuncture, aromatherapy, Reiki, and others may complement these treatments. Determining the composition of the treatment team is an essential aspect of providing quality services to the patient and family. An example of an extended care team which includes complementary disciplines can be seen in Figure 1 (It should be noted that the placement of the various disciplines in Figure 1 does not suggest their relational value).

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

In the interdisciplinary team, members work more closely together in both the planning and providing of services. West (1990) outlined several criteria for a successful team:

   The interdisciplinary team is formed from a group of individuals
   who will undoubtedly have been drawn to this work for a variety of
   reasons. Most care-givers have personal reasons for needing to
   care, and a wish to understand and be involved in the dynamics of
   patient and family as well as in team work is a good beginning. … 

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Synerdisciplinary Music Therapy Treatment Team Approach for Hospice and Palliative Care
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.