Notable Deaths

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 10, 2008 | Go to article overview

Notable Deaths


Alexander Vladimir dArbeloff

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Alexander Vladimir dArbeloff, a former chairman of the MIT Corp., died Tuesday. He was 80.

DArbeloffs family said he died at Massachusetts General Hospital after an illness.

DArbeloff was the co-founder and longtime CEO of Teradyne Inc. He became chairman of MITs board of trustees in 1997 and later taught at MITs Sloan School of Management.

With his wife, Brit, dArbeloff created the Fund for Excellence in MIT Education to support teaching innovations in science and engineering.

MIT President Emeritus Charles Vest said dArbeloff loved to challenge ideas and was as much at home in

a classroom as in a boardroom.

Ruth Greenglass

NEW YORK Ruth Greenglass, whose testimony in the Rosenberg spy trial helped send her sister-in-law Ethel Rosenberg to the electric chair, died April 7. She was 84.

Her death was revealed in court documents filed in late June. She died in New York, according to Social Security records. Greenglass had been living under an alias to avoid association with the Rosenberg case.

Greenglass and her husband, David, confessed to being part of an effort to smuggle secrets to the Soviets and said Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, their relatives, recruited them.

Historians continue to debate the truthfulness of their testimony concerning Ethel Rosenberg, whose guilt has long been questioned.

During the 1951 trial, the couple said they saw Ethel Rosenberg transcribing stolen atomic secrets on a portable typewriter in her apartment. Their account was the best piece of evidence linking Ethel Rosenberg, Davids sister, to an alleged plot to steal research data from the Manhattan Project.

By cooperating, David Greenglass, a wartime machinist in Los Alamos, N.M., who had been charged along with the Rosenbergs, was spared a possible death sentence. He served 10 years in prison. Ruth Greenglass was never charged.

Since then, decoded Soviet cables have seemed to confirm that Julius Rosenberg was a spy, but doubts have remained about Ethels involvement. …

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