Transnational Education Programs

Manila Bulletin, October 5, 2008 | Go to article overview

Transnational Education Programs


NEW approaches have been introduced to reach out to the learners and given names such as distance education, cross-border education, and lately, transnational education. What is transnational education? And how has Cavite State University (CvSU) been involved in this educational activity?

Transnational education refers to the real or virtual movement of teachers, students, courses of study, and academic programs from one country to another (CHED, 2003).

Categories of Transnational Education

Memorandum Order No. 06, series of 2003 of the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) categorized transnational education as follows: 1) distance education, and 2) foreign educational programs offered in the conventional mode.

Distance education. This type of education program may be offered solely by the Foreign Higher Education Provider (FHEP) or in partnership with a local agency or higher education institution (HEI). It has four modes of implementation, namely: a) academic programs offered directly by an FHEP with no local representative/partner, b) academic programs offered by an FHEP with a local representative/partner, c) distance education programs offered jointly by an FHEP and a Philippine HEI, and d) franchised distance educational programs/courses.

Academic programs offered directly by an FHEP with no local representative/partner are completely offered by the FHEP without employing a local partner, and credits/degrees are granted solely by the FHEP.

For academic programs offered by an FHEP with a local representative/partner, local learning centers are established to provide student services such as student information, registration, and related services. Local individuals may also be hired as tutors. Credits and degrees are granted solely by the FHEP.

For distance education programs offered jointly by an FHEP and a Philippine HEI, the FHEP enters into a consortium or partnership with a Philippine public or private HEI. Instruction may be supplemented by tutorials conducted in local learning centers. The FHEP and the Philippine HEI jointly grant the credits and degrees.

Under the franchised distance educational programs/courses scheme, a local HEI uses educational programs/courses owned by an FHEP under a license agreement from the FHEP and in accordance with the established standards and policies of the FHEP. The local HEI grants the degree/certificates.

Foreign educational programs offered in the conventional mode. The conventional programs are classroom-based and require physical attendance by students. They are implemented under three schemes, namely: a) conventional programs offered by an FHEP through a local branch or satellite campus, b) conventional programs offered by an FHEP through a local representative/partner/broker/franchiser, and c) franchised foreign educational programs/courses.

For conventional programs offered by an FHEP through a local branch or satellite campus, the FHEP establishes a branch or satellite campus in the host country in accordance with pertinent laws, rules and regulations, policies, standards and guidelines of the host country. Academic degrees are awarded by the FHEP.

For conventional programs offered by an FHEP through a local representative/partner/broker/franchiser, the FHEP offers academic programs through a franchise arrangement with a local partner or HEI for the conduct of its academic programs. Degrees are granted by the FHEP.

For the franchised foreign educational programs/courses scheme, the local HEI conducts foreign educational programs/courses under license from the FHEP in accordance with the established standards and policies of the FHEP. The local HEI grants the degrees/certificates.

The Cavite State University experience

The CvSU (formerly Don Severino Agricultural College - DSAC) in Indang, Cavite has been involved in this program through the admission of foreign students and trainees taking up undergraduate and graduate programs as well as short-term courses since the mid 70s. …

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