Mathematics Education

Manila Bulletin, October 17, 2008 | Go to article overview

Mathematics Education


AS some of our readers pointed out, what is important in education is to learn how to think. But to think it is necessary to have a language. There are also special languages. Accounting is said to be the language of business. Mathematics is the language of science. Filipino math education is sadly deficient. Our students are more at home with Biology in contrast to Physics and Chemistry because Biology requires the least mathematics. The first need is to have an improved attitude towards mathematics. Filipino students have often had traumatic and frustrating experiences with math. Math is a chain and if one link is missing it is most frustrating to pull on such a chain with a missing link.

A subject should be taught when the child is most ready for it. Mathematics should be taught early since it needs a lot of memory work and the young have excellent memories. There are two tables that have to be memorized cold: The addition table and the multiplication table. Although higher mathematics may need a lot of logic and imagination, at the start it should be sheer memorization, cold memory with automatic reflex answers. Rote memory of the multiplication table is often done but not the addition table. After these tables only a few formulas are needed, like fractions, decimals, powers, equation, etc. One does not have to understand their rationale but only their use. (I remember taking a class for a whole semester on the concept of Zero. Only the professional mathematicians have to go through these concepts.) The Arabs developed our mathematics as early as the third century BC. It is a fantastic invention. It also did away with the cumbersome Roman numbers and mathematics. Many mathematical inventions were done by geniuses like Leibnitz when they were teenagers in the 16th and 17th century. We are told that these European math geniuses used to toast each other with: "To mathematical elegance. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mathematics Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.