International School Library Month: World-Class Literacy and Learning through School Libraries

Manila Bulletin, October 23, 2008 | Go to article overview

International School Library Month: World-Class Literacy and Learning through School Libraries


INTERNATIONAL School Library Month is observed in October each year. The theme for 2008, "World Literacy and Learning through School Libraries," highlights the responsibility of libraries as a compelling framework for 21st century worldwide learning and literacy.

Libraries are supposedly being swept away by the digital revolution. Yet, library power is still very much alive, and has become even more potent in this new age. This priceless influence adds to the human intellect which equates to human progress, and from this springs literacy and knowledge which increase productivity.

As a vehicle for human progress, the library is irreplaceable. School libraries should be central to the 21st century educational experience and the base for a positive attitude by young people towards information skills development, lifelong learning, and enhancing one's chances in their lives. Today's graduates need to be critical thinkers, problem solvers, and effective communicators who are proficient in both core subjects and 21st century content and skills.

In today's information age, an individual's success and even existence, depends largely on the ability to access, evaluate, and utilize information. This challenges nations to make education a priority in preparing students to compete in the worldwide marketplace and make informed decisions about problems facing society. In this environment, to guarantee every young person an equal and effective educational opportunity, school libraries are an important component to meet curriculum needs. …

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