How New York Is Becoming the Safest Big City in America

By Giuliani, Rudolph W. | USA TODAY, January 1997 | Go to article overview

How New York Is Becoming the Safest Big City in America


Giuliani, Rudolph W., USA TODAY


NEW YORK is just about the safest big city in America. Some people may find that hard to believe. They still see old movies and television programs that show New York as a hotbed of robbery and murder. Because the city is the media capital of the world, crime in die five boroughs sometimes receives the sort of high-profile coverage that revives outdated stereotypes about New York being a very dangerous place to live and work.

In fact, just the Opposite is true. in 1996, New York cut its crime rate by 38%, compared to 1993. New Yorkers and their world-class police department have taken forceful control of the city's crime problem. Felony crime rates have fallen to levels that haven't been seen in a generation. Murder is down almost 50%, and there has been a 42% decline in robberies and a 46% drop in auto theft.

Even compared with smaller cities, New York does well. In 1995 - among the 203 American municipalities with populations exceeding 100,000 - New York ranked 150th in crime (down from 88th in 1993). Meanwhile, the New York Police Department (NYPD) is mounting a comprehensive citywide anti-drug campaign that promises to reduce crime even further.

Yet, some people still aren't convinced. They say that its lower crime rates simply are part of a national reduction in crime. That explanation doesn't hold, however. National trends are determined by what happens in local communities. In reality, the drop in national crime rates is not the cause of New York's successful fight against crime, but a result of it.

According to the FBI's Preliminary Uniform Crime Report for 1995, New York - which accounts for slightly more than three percent of the nation's crime - was responsible for 70% of the decline for the entire country. New York accounted for nearly 23% of the drop in homicide and nearly 35% of the reduction in robbery. New York isn't following a national trend, but setting it.

What is New York doing differently? Why have we been so successful in the fight against crime@ Part of the answer is that we have been working effectively to get our communities involved in public safety programs. Most of all, we have been deploying our newly unified police department @the Housing and Transit Police Departments now are part of the NYPD) as never before. Until recently, the city's police officers were not being used to full advantage. Like many police departments, the NYPD lacked strategic direction and oversight. It could deal effectively with individual crimes, but wasn't as effective at preventing diem and reversing crime trends.

Today is a different story. We have made fundamental changes in the way the department does its work. We established separate, detailed strategies for dealing with guns, youth crime, drugs, domestic violence, and auto-related theft, and paid special attention to the key objective of enhancing the quality of life in public spaces.

As a result, the crime fighting talent of a great police organization has been unleashed. For example, the NYPD began interrogating all arrestees - even those detained for minor crimes - about guns, drugs, and unsolved felonies. In this way, it developed a surprising number of leads, which in turn generated search warrants, multiple gun and drug arrests, rests, and even homicide arrests. We found that enforcing laws against relatively minor crimes such as public drinking or not wearing a motorcycle helmet were helping to solve far more serious cases involving gun and drug dealers and other dangerous criminals.

Indeed, a nationally publicized beating that occurred in Central Park in June, 1996, and other crime - including the murder of a Park Avenue storekeeper - were solved because the perpetrator previously had been arrested for subway fare evasion, so the police had his fingerprints on file.

There is an even better reason for the police to make arrests for minor violations. I am a firm believer in the theory that "minor" crimes and "quality-of-life" offenses are all part of the larger picture. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

How New York Is Becoming the Safest Big City in America
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.