Education Grants Will Fund 17 Projects

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), November 28, 2008 | Go to article overview

Education Grants Will Fund 17 Projects


Byline: Anne Williams The Register-Guard

SPRINGFIELD - The Springfield Education Foundation has awarded $9,953 in small grants for 17 projects proposed by Springfield public school teachers, many of them the kind of "extras" that enrich a child's classroom experience.

The grants, for which the foundation received 68 applications, will place ukuleles in the arms of Mount Vernon Elementary School children, help Brattain Elementary students boost reading skills using iPods and allow Agnes Stewart Middle School sixth-graders to build their own terra cotta soldiers for a unit on ancient China.

Agnes Stewart teacher Sue Dickman submitted the grant for the Chinese culture lesson after doing the same project with three other teachers on a shoestring budget last year. With the state's fiscal woes already trickling down to schools, "there's no way we were going to get the money for it this year," she said.

Though she received only about half of what she requested, the $242 grant will still cover clay and tools, as well as some bamboo brushes and ink and possibly even some Chinese food to sample.

"It was pretty cool (last year), because what we learned is there were kids who had never touched clay, and were just awed by the feel of it," Dickman said.

While the mini-grants are its best-known initiative, the nonprofit foundation is moving aggressively this year to boost donations and pursue more grants and partnerships with businesses and community organizations, said its chairman, Bill Spiry. With a $20,000 investment by the school district, the foundation has brought in a consultant from a Texas firm called Foundation Innovation to help devise new strategies.

"We're doing some things right now to take us to a higher level of performance," said Spiry, who has been with the foundation since 2001. "We have a very committed group of people serving on the board, and we really have had a lot of ideas, but not really the ammunition and the knowledge to effectuate it as much as we'd like to."

Founded in 1994, the foundation started strong but soon sputtered to a near-standstill. Spiry helped give it a kick-start when he came on board, and momentum continues to build.

During the past several years, the foundation has collected about $17,000 a year from individuals and businesses, some of it earmarked for specific schools, said treasurer David Gault.

Some comes from proceeds for the district calendar, which features art by Springfield students - although Spiry said it's minimal.

"We look at that more as a good way of getting the mission of the school district out there, demonstrating what we do," he said. "Frankly, we're happy if we break even on our calendar with what we're putting into it."

Last year, the foundation received an additional $45,000 in special grants from businesses and foundations, most of which was directed toward specific programs, including the annual Battle of Books competition, the Academy of Arts & Academics' guest artist program and the Gift of Literacy event, at which every first-grader receives a new book. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Education Grants Will Fund 17 Projects
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.