Clinton Backing OCC Chief in Uproar over Coffeegate.'(President Clinton Supports Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Head Eugene A. Ludwig in Campaign Contribution Scandal)

By de Senerpont Domis, Olaf | American Banker, January 30, 1997 | Go to article overview

Clinton Backing OCC Chief in Uproar over Coffeegate.'(President Clinton Supports Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Head Eugene A. Ludwig in Campaign Contribution Scandal)


de Senerpont Domis, Olaf, American Banker


Comptroller of the Currency Eugene A. Ludwig took a risk and it paid off big this week.

Yanked into the national spotlight Saturday when The Washington Post and The New York Times featured front-page stories about a meeting President Clinton held with bankers last year, Mr. Ludwig defied the White House and said he never should have been invited.

The comptroller's assertiveness paid off this week when White House officials retracted their position that there was nothing wrong with having a regulator at an event sponsored by the Democratic National Committee.

In fact, President Clinton is now backing Mr. Ludwig, saying at a press conference Tuesday that the comptroller "should have been told who was sponsoring it, and it would have been better had he not come."

White House officials have repeatedly said that participants at the meetings were not obligated to contribute to the president's campaign, and representatives of the bankers in attendance said donations were not discussed.

Still, President Clinton's campaign attracted more than $373,000 from the 17 banks represented at the meeting. Bob Dole only got $222,000 from the institutions, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

Mr. Ludwig is now being praised for his willingness to voice his opinion, even though it meant disagreeing with the White House.

"He's too intelligent a man to compromise the affairs of his office with a political endeavor," said O. Jay Tomson, chairman of First Citizens National Bank, Mason City, Iowa. "He had the backbone and personal fortitude to stand up and say what he believed, and that indicates how he feels about the independence of his office."

"Gene has handled this extremely well, and now the president has stepped up and backed him," said former comptroller Robert L. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Clinton Backing OCC Chief in Uproar over Coffeegate.'(President Clinton Supports Office of the Comptroller of the Currency Head Eugene A. Ludwig in Campaign Contribution Scandal)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.