Editor's Notes

Nineteenth-Century Prose, Winter 1989 | Go to article overview

Editor's Notes


This issue adds yet another new wrinkle to the crazyquilt tapestry of Nineteenth Century Prose. It is the first issue produced at our new home, Mesa State College. A new staff has joined me to produce these semi-annual numbers. They are enthusiastic and have already shown a remarkable willingness to handle the "drudgery" involved in turning typescripts into print. I am confident we will be able to maintain the high quality that characterized--in most cases--our journal when we were sponsored by the United States Naval Academy.

I say "in most cases" because we are still smarting from errors we allowed to slip into the first number published under our new title. In the last issue, we reprinted Professor Sam Ullmann's article on Tennyson and Arnold because we had inadvertently dropped an important line from the text in Vol. 16, No. 1. In this issue we are reprinting yet another submission, Allan Emery's review of Robert Weisbuch's Atlantic Double-Cross. Professor Emery had sent us a well written, detailed analysis of this important critical study. What we published was riddled with typographical errors, dropped words, garbled sentences far too many for us to simply publish an errata sheet. We felt it our professional responsibility to Professor Emery, Professor Weisbuch, and The University of Chicago Press to produce a corrected version in toto.

So much for bad news. The good news about this issue is indeed manifold. Our lead article presents exactly the kind of scholarship we had hoped to attract when we expanded our focus and changed our name. Distinguished British scholar Agatha Ramm, Emeritus Professor of History at Somerville College, Oxford, has graciously allowed us to print an expanded version of her 1981 Bryce Lecture, "Gladstone as a Man of Letters." Though she had produced a limited edition of the original lecture some years ago, this version is substantially revised and enlarged, and its appearance in Nineteenth Century Prose should make it available to a larger audience, particularly to literary scholars. John Powell's useful checklist of the correspondence of Gladstone and Lionel Tollemache seemed to us to be a sensible companion piece to Ramm's analytical study. We hope our regular readers will agree with our assessment, and that the journal will attract new subscribers who will find the promise of future scholarship such as this worth the cost of a subscription.

The College of Arts & Sciences at Creighton University is sponsoring a Newman Centennial Conference on October 19-20, 1990. The conference director, Rev. Michael E. Allsopp, has solicited papers and abstracts (250 words) on the Oxford Movement; Newman's contributions to history, theology, and literature; his place in history; and his influence at the Second Vatican Council. Additional details regarding the final shape of the Conference will be available after March 1. …

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