'Get Tough' Policies Are Leading More to Prison: Our Nation Has a Growing Vested Interest in Keeping Millions of Americans Behind Bars

National Catholic Reporter, January 31, 1997 | Go to article overview

'Get Tough' Policies Are Leading More to Prison: Our Nation Has a Growing Vested Interest in Keeping Millions of Americans Behind Bars


U.S. prisons and jails held more than 1,630,000 people in mid-1996, more than double the number from the mid-1980s, according to a Justice Department report released last week.

By the end of 1995, 1 out of every 167 ri Americans was in prison or jail, compared to 1 out of every 320 a decade earlier, according to the department's Bureau of Justice Statistics. The world's highest incarceration rate has seesawed in recent years between the United States and Russia, with both far outdistancing other nations.

The bureau reported that the nation's prison and jail population grew by an average of nearly 8 percent a year between mid-1985 and June 30, 1996. The steep increase reflected a number of get-tough laws that have been adopted by the federal government and the states in an effort to put more serious criminal offenders in prison for longer periods of time.

While the number of prisoners in this country has more than doubled in the past 20 years, the numbers on parole are even greater. The vast majority have been convicted of drug-related offenses. Astonishingly, nearly one in three young black men between the ages of 20 and 29 is under criminal justice supervision on any given day. The "War on Drugs" is the single largest factor contributing to this crisis facing the black community.

With the new wave of harsh sentencing laws (such as "three strikes and you're out") the one-in-three figure is likely to get even worse soon. One 1995 prison survey found that state corrections officials expect their 1994 inmate populations to rise 51 percent by the year 2000.

In recent years, African-American women have experienced the greatest increase in criminal justice supervision of all demographic groups. Their rate of criminal justice supervision rose by 78 percent from 1989-94.

The number of black (non-Hispanic) women incarcerated in state prisons for drug offenses increased more than eightfold, by 828 percent, from 1986 to 1991.

While African-American arrest rates for violent crime -- 45 percent o arrests nationally -- are disproportionate to that group's share of the population, this proportion has not changed significantly for 20 years. For drug offenses, though, the African-American proportion of arrests increased from 24 percent in 1980 to 39l percent in 1993, well above the African-American percentage of drug users in the national population.

African-Americans and Hispanics now constitute almost 90 percent of offenders sentenced to state prison for drug possession.

The Department of Justice has ignored its own 1994 report, which questioned the wisdom of mandatory minimum sentencing, and now sides with the Republican-dominated Congress in opposing the Sentencing Commission's downward revision of crack cocaine sentences to the level of powder cocaine. The crack/powder disparity is a major factor in the racial bias in today's criminal justice system.

This incredible state of affairs, where 3 out of every 100 of your neighbors is involved with our criminal justice system, is a direct result of the efforts of politicians who have discovered during the past decade that Americans love politicians who promise to get tough on crime." We have elected these people, and they have begun to deliver on their harsh promises. We have built more and more prisons, creating a quickly evolving "prison-industrial complex. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Get Tough' Policies Are Leading More to Prison: Our Nation Has a Growing Vested Interest in Keeping Millions of Americans Behind Bars
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.