Computer Organized Physical Education

By Lambdin, Dolly | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, January 1997 | Go to article overview

Computer Organized Physical Education


Lambdin, Dolly, JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


This is the final article in this three-part feature on assessment. In October, the series began with two articles - an introductory article on practical assessment for physical education teachers and an article on how two physical education teachers use assessment in their programs. The series continued in the November/December issue with an article describing an university student teaching assessment project and another on some effective assessment techniques that can be used by teachers. In this final article, Dolly Lambdin describes a computer-organized data management system designed to improve record keeping, planning, and communication.

"I know what I want students to know and be able to do. But how do I know where to start teaching, when I don't know what knowledge and skills they already possess?"

The ability to gather, compile, and portray appropriate data on children's learning is becoming increasingly important as outcomes-based education and authentic assessment continue to gather support. With outcomes-based curricular models, the teacher is required to document each student's mastery of standard content. The authentic assessment movement encourages teachers to use tasks that are meaningful to students to gather information about individual strengths and needs. While both these educational reforms are important, the specialist teacher with 400 or more students may find it too difficult even to collect the data, much less use it. With traditional recording methods, much of the usefulness of the data is lost in the pages of the grade book.

Computerized data management systems, however, can provide the opportunity to use this data to plan lessons, communicate with students and parents, and perform meaningful program evaluations. Whether it is accountability, outcomes-based curriculum models, or just a desire to offer appropriate instruction that drives your interest in keeping track of students' learning, computerized data management may hold some answers for you. This article is designed to (1) review the need for and appropriate use of individual assessments, (2) explain how computerized data management can combat the logistical difficulties of making use of the data, and (3) present Project COPE (Computer Organized Physical Education) - a computerized data management system designed to improve record keeping, planning, and communication.

The Problem

As we all know, physical education specialists teach 200 to 600 students per day in 25- to 45-minute periods. Many of us teach each child for 3 to 7 years. Although there are tremendous advantages to seeing children develop over time, keeping track of individual student progress with classes coming one after another all day long is extremely difficult. In the past, knowing which students in each class needed additional help or practice on specific learning objectives was a data management nightmare! Dedicated teachers developed personal recording systems to manage information for a few specific areas of performance, but this meant individually reviewing the class records of 11 to 20 classes for each objective considered. Many teachers use computer programs to manipulate fitness data, but these programs are generally restricted to tracking specific fitness variables. Although they are useful in determining winners of fitness awards and calculating class statistics, they usually do not allow teachers to do individual manipulations of the data (such as identifying which students need additional work in a specific area), or to track other variables or skills. For the most part dedicated physical education teachers have had to resign themselves to providing lessons based on group needs and the teacher's personal memory rather than individual needs and data.

In my own teaching I struggled with the following frustrations:

I spent long hours poring over data in my grade book trying to determine which students needed help in which skills. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Computer Organized Physical Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.