Travel: Perfect Nuclear Family Holiday; EASTERN EUROPE SUMMER GETAWAY & CITY BREAK BEN RANKIN Discovers That Lithuania Has Come in from the Cold and Become a Destination Hot Spot Offering Something for Everyone

The Mirror (London, England), December 27, 2008 | Go to article overview

Travel: Perfect Nuclear Family Holiday; EASTERN EUROPE SUMMER GETAWAY & CITY BREAK BEN RANKIN Discovers That Lithuania Has Come in from the Cold and Become a Destination Hot Spot Offering Something for Everyone


Byline: BEN RANKIN

FOR a holiday excursion with a difference this was going to take some beating.

Deep in the lush green forest of a beautiful national park we had spent the morning poking around a nuclear missile base.

Yes, I know most people would rather be above ground in the sun and might well have given it a miss.

But I couldn't resist the thought of a day trip to a former Soviet bunker in Lithuania's stunning Zemaitija National Park. And it was a blast.

At the height of the Cold War, four massive rockets were aimed at the UK and our European neighbours from this once-top secret site, which has been empty since 1979.

Nothing was ever fired but if there had been, well, let's just say it wouldn't be on the tourist trail now - and nor would I be writing about it.

A guided tour will take you deep into the dingy confines of the underground lair, where you'll learn about the fascinating but macabre existence of the Red Army soldiers deployed there.

You'll see the silos, get to peer into the 30ft rocket shafts and stand on their domed lids.

The one-hour tour is dirt cheap (the equivalent of pounds 1-pounds 6 depending on the time of year) and it's unforgettable.

It's a grim reminder of how different - and tougher - life used to be in Lithuania during 50 years of Soviet rule.

The largest of the Baltic states, the country gained its independence in 1990 and has wasted no time in rediscovering its identity.

The communist past still looms large but this is now very much a forward-thinking country and great for a bargain short break.

My trip began in Europe's Capital of Culture for 2009, Vilnius, which is undergoing a makeover and turned out to far more modern than I had expected.

There's a lot of rebuilding going on and there are plenty of clothes stores to check out and chic bars and coffee shops to hang out in.

It's a pleasant if unspectacular place with a UNESCO protected baroque old town that sits peacefully among the modernisation going on around it.

My introduction to the local food was a meat-fest. The menu at Zemaiciai (www.zemaiciai.lt) was packed with reasonably-priced dishes and a plate of pork, sausage, bacon, mash and sauerkraut cost pounds 12.

Just the kind of hearty lunch you need before visiting a KGB prison - well, it was a prison.

It's now a museum, and it's located in the centre of Vilnius.

The only museum of its kind in the Baltics, it offers a fascinating insight into the sneaky - and brutal - techniques used by the Soviets to suppress their subjects.

The names of 1,000 people executed here are written on the outer walls but for those who'd rather leave the Cold War where it belongs - in the past - then there's plenty to explore outside the capital.

It's about a three-and-a-half hour drive from the east to west borders and no more than five hours in a car from north to south.

And the first thing you'll notice when you hit the outer limits of Vilnius is how green and flat the terrain is. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Travel: Perfect Nuclear Family Holiday; EASTERN EUROPE SUMMER GETAWAY & CITY BREAK BEN RANKIN Discovers That Lithuania Has Come in from the Cold and Become a Destination Hot Spot Offering Something for Everyone
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.