Big Labor Bailout

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 28, 2008 | Go to article overview

Big Labor Bailout


Byline: Richard Ebeling, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Much has been written about the so-called Employee Free Choice Act, or card-check bill, Congress is expected to approve early in its new term. But few people have identified the controversial legislation for what it is: a bailout for big labor.

For decades now union membership has been declining in the United States, with the exception of public employee unions. In 1945, more than a third of all U.S. workers were union members. By the early 1980s, that number had decreased to barely 20 percent of the work force. In 2007, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported union membership was down to 12 percent of wage and salary workers.

Union membership is highest, as a percentage of the work force, in the public sector, where some 40 percent of local, state, county and federal employees, including a high percentage of schoolteachers, belong to unions.

In the private sector, however, union membership generally has been declining. While a few fields are still highly unionized - 22 percent of transportation and utility workers, for example, nearly 20 percent of telecom workers, and 14 percent of construction workers, according to government statistics - overall union membership across all industries and trades (excluding government) stands at just 7.5 percent.

Like the Big Three automakers, organized labor wants government to step in and reverse its decline, boosting membership and increasing dues collection. That's the real purpose of the Employee Free Choice Act.

First introduced in the House of Representatives in February 2007, the legislation would allow a union to organize a company or workplace without requiring a secret ballot vote of the workers, as is now typically required. Union organizers and supporters would merely have to persuade a majority of workers to sign cards saying they approve of union representation.

Such approval would not always be totally voluntary. If history teaches us anything it's that organized labor is not above arm-twisting and intimidation. That's why the secret ballot is important. To keep union organizers off their backs, workers who might oppose union representation can sign union consent forms - knowing they can then vote against union representation in the privacy of the voting booth. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Big Labor Bailout
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.