A Citation Analysis of the Impact of Journals on Contemporary Small Enterprise Research

By Romero, Claudio; Ratnatunga, Janek | Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice, Spring 1996 | Go to article overview

A Citation Analysis of the Impact of Journals on Contemporary Small Enterprise Research


Romero, Claudio, Ratnatunga, Janek, Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice


In all academic disciplines, researchers typically form groups or sub-sets that focus on common questions in common ways (Burt, 1977; Price, 1965). Within these groups, concepts attributable to one researcher may be used by another for testing, extending or refining. Through this process, one researcher's work builds on that of another acknowledging via a citation, the historical link. Thus, when one scholar cites the prior work of another, citations provide a means of documenting this history (Culnan, O'Reilly, & Chatman, 1990). Citation studies come under the broad field of "Bibliometrics"; i.e. the quantitative study of literatures as they are reflected in bibliographies (see White & McCain, 1989, and the literature quoted therein). Therefore, refereed academic journals have played an increasingly important role in the dissemination of scientific information, particularly in the last decade. This is as true in small enterprise research as in any other discipline. Further, the category of the journal in which articles are published can affect an individual's promotion, tenure, and salary as well as his or her brand name and ability to change employment (Liebowitz & Palmer, 1984). Bibliometric distributions can also be used to rank authors and academic departments (Chung, Pak, & Cox, 1992). For these and other reasons listed below, several efforts have been made to judge the various qualities and merits of individual journals by the use of citations appended to journal articles. This is accomplished by measuring the number of acknowledgments between and within disciplines.

A set of published articles and their bibliographic citations, commonly known as a citation analysis, has been used for a number of purposes in various disciplines of the social sciences. For example, citation analysis has been used in the accounting discipline to evaluate accounting faculties and doctoral programs (Robinson & Adler, 1981; Brown & Gardner, 1985; Gamble & O'Doherty, 1985), to compare citation-based evaluations with those obtained by peer judgment of accounting journals (Howard & Nikolai, 1983; Nobes, 1985; Beattie & Ryan, 1989), to assess the reputation and impact of research within the accounting discipline (McRae, 1974; Dyckman & Zeff, 1984; Brown & Gardner, 1985; Beattie & Ryan, 1991), to assess the impact of individual accounting journals (Brown, Gardner, & Vasarhely, 1987), and to determine views on perceived quality of accounting journals among accounting faculties (Brown & Huefner, 1994).

In other fields, citation analysis has been used to compare citation counts to editorial rankings (Quandt, 1976; White & White, 1977), to identify the level of academic research reflected in small enterprise issues identified by government reports (Brockhaus, 1988), to assess the impact of interdisciplinary research (Hamelman & Mazze, 1973) and to assess the influence of consumer market research (Leong, 1989; Cote, Leong, & Cote, 1991). Citation studies have also been done in the fields of management information systems (Culnan, 1986, 1987; Culnan & Swanson, 1986; Gogan, 1992), auditing (Smith & Krogstad, 1984), organizational behaviour (Culnan, et al., 1990), marketing (Heischmidt & Gorden, 1993), and strategic management (Franke, Edlund, & Oster, 1990).(1)

RESEARCH APPROACH AND MOTIVATION

Citation analysis is based on the assumption that if an author cites a journal, he or she has found it useful, and therefore the more frequently a journal is cited, the greater it's role in the scholarly communication process (Nisonger, 1994). The earliest of such studies was conducted in 1927 for chemistry journals (Gross & Gross, 1927). Nisonger (1992) provides a bibliography of the last decadeis major journal ranking studies. Such studies have been particularly helpful to librarians seeking new tools to help them evaluate journals in a period of high inflation in available serials (Garfield, 1972a; Smith, 1985; Broadus, 1985; White & McCain, 1989; Nisonger, 1994). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Citation Analysis of the Impact of Journals on Contemporary Small Enterprise Research
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.