Experiential Training: Connecting School Counselors-in-Training, English as a Second Language (ESL) Teachers, and ESL Students

By Burnham, Joy J.; Mantero, Miguel et al. | Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, January 2009 | Go to article overview

Experiential Training: Connecting School Counselors-in-Training, English as a Second Language (ESL) Teachers, and ESL Students


Burnham, Joy J., Mantero, Miguel, Hooper, Lisa M., Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development


English as a second language (ESL) students present challenges to counselors who are unaccustomed to working with students who speak limited English. A field experience prepared school counselors-in-training to develop cultural sensitivity while working with ESL teachers and students. The counselors suggested that early experiential learning fostered multicultural sensitivity and refined counseling skills.

Los estudiantes de ingles como segunda lengua (ESL) presentan desafios para aquellos consejeros que no estan acostrumbrados a trabajar con estudiantes con un nivel de ingles limitado. Una experiencia practica de campo preparo a los consejeros escolares en formacion para que desarrollaran una sensibilidad cultural mientras trabajaban con profesores y alumnos de ESL. Los consejeros indicaron que el aprendizaje experiencial en fase temprana fomento su sensibilidad multicultural y perfecciono sus habilidades en consejeria.

**********

This exploratory project examined the potential benefits of a school counselor-in-training experiential exercise that combined classroom learning with early field experience. This project also examined the extent to which counseling students found that early field experience fostered multicultural sensitivity and awareness when working with English as a second language (ESL) students and teachers.

Three practices in school counseling training models informed this experiential project: the use of collaboration, multicultural awareness and sensitivity, and working with ESL students. Because the use of collaboration has lagged behind other techniques as an important component in school counseling (Sink, 2005) and because creating "collaborative environments" is still misunderstood (Goh, Wahl, McDonald, Brissett, & Yoon, 2007; Kim, 2005; Sink, 2005), the school counseling training approach offers a means to practice collaboration with an underserved and rapidly increasing population of ESL students who oftentimes have limited interactions with school counselors (Clemente & Collison, 2000; Goh et al., 2007; Hagan, 2004; McCall-Perez, 2000).

In addition to the importance of collaborative helping in the context of the school setting, the practice of multicultural counseling is essential for school counselors. As the population with whom counselors work continues to diversify, school counselors have a significant need to develop knowledge, skills, and awareness in how to best work with racial and ethnic minority students and their families (Roysircar, 2003). Critical to building multicultural competency is to provide school counselors with opportunities that allow for the translation of awareness and knowledge evidenced in the university classroom into their actual counseling skills with students (Burnett, Hamel, & Long, 2004; Dickson, Jepsen, & Barbee, 2008). School counselors who demonstrate cultural sensitivity and awareness see increased levels of responsiveness and positive outcomes among their students in both academic and therapeutic contexts (Clemente & Collison, 2000). Moreover, empirical research has established that when counselors--irrespective of orientation (e.g., school, family, community)--are sensitive to multicultural issues, clients often feel more understood and respected (Zhang & Dixon, 2001). This translates into the counselor having both an increased sense of clinical and technical skill (Welfel, 2003) and a support role in helping ESL students build "cross-cultural bridges" (Goh et al., 2007).

the significance of and need for multicultural competency in school counseling

Changes in demographics have underlined the need for professionals working in school systems to examine the extent to which they are prepared and competent to offer the needed services to culturally and linguistically diverse populations. There are few "multicultural training opportunities in naturalistic settings ... for graduate counseling students" (Roysircar, Gard, Hubbell, & Ortega, 2005, p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Experiential Training: Connecting School Counselors-in-Training, English as a Second Language (ESL) Teachers, and ESL Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.