Art Tourism


ART tourism is in vogue thanks to people who passionately pursue their love for art and satisfy their curiosity about different cultures. Oftentimes, frequent travelers eventually become amateur collectors of sorts, accumulating souvenirs, handicrafts and artistic finds during their trips. Soon they yearn for non-material cultural experiences so they look for art festivals and fairs with corollary activities like concerts and plays. There are professional collectors known to be seasoned travelers and are, always in search for emerging, promising artists whose works they gobble up as future investments or to enhance their inventory. Art tourism is enticing, educational and informative; they can be festive and memorable as many of them include special film showings, vibrant theatrical performances, and unique concerts featuring prestigious musicians. Increasingly, tourists are including art fairs in their itinerary.

There are hundreds of art fairs and festivals all over the world for all kinds of tourists. The high-end ones, probably exclusive and horrendously expensive, are havens of curators of top museums and cultural institutions, international art dealers and auctioneers, secretive eccentric collectors hungry for works by the great masters. Most of them converge at the "empress of all fairs" the European Fine Art Fair held in Maastricht, Netherlands where they quarrel over Rembrandts, Van Goghs, and even Michelangelos as well as the rarest indigenous art, ostentatious but historic collectibles in silver, wood, gold and precious stones. …

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