McCain Now in Control of Campaign Tone

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 31, 2008 | Go to article overview

McCain Now in Control of Campaign Tone


For Illinois delegates, the 2008 Democratic National Convention was a "Tale of Two Cities" Denver and Springfield, Ill.

Denver was easy. Nearly, all Illinois Democrats bellowed and cooed their love, support and admiration for their partys presidential nominee and native son, U.S. Sen. Barack Obama.

During the convention, the delegates ate breakfast together and heard countless speakers express their devotion to Obama. Little effort was made to be politically analytical save for Chicago Mayor Richard Daley who in his own unique way of speaking gave terse practical advice to die-hard Hillary Clinton supporters.

Springfield in Denver was another matter. On Aug. 27, otherwise known as "Wacky Wednesday," top Illinois Democrats engaged in one-on-one hugs. Much has been written about this remarkable event, but from someone who has been to both party conventions since 1984 it was by far the most unusual and dramatic political spectacle I have ever seen.

As for the upcoming Nov. 4 election, U.S. Sen. John McCain has to hit a home run at his partys convention this week. Why? Barack Obama has pushed McCain into an election challenge no, not one based on the overused "change" rather its the word "turnout."

Obamas hard-nosed, Chicago-based political brain trust is literally modeling its fall campaign on Karl Roves 2004 strategy to re-elect President George Bush. The Obama game plan is to register and then turn out on Election Day, millions of new voters who are either young, African-American or poor. His advisers see these folks as untapped Obama voters who in key battleground states could turn GOP "red" into Democratic "blue."

McCain cannot out-spectacle, out-orate or outspend Obama. The Arizona senator needs to find a rhythm

and a theme that will generate excitement from his partys conservative base while at the same time counter the Denver Democrats arguments that he is no longer a "maverick."

It will not be easy! …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

McCain Now in Control of Campaign Tone
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.