Good, Clean Reading Web Site Features Reviews of 'Cozy' Books with No Sex, Violence or Bad Language

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 10, 2008 | Go to article overview

Good, Clean Reading Web Site Features Reviews of 'Cozy' Books with No Sex, Violence or Bad Language


Byline: Abby Scalf ascalf@dailyherald.com

Diana Vickery loves to read.

So much so that she reads four to five books a week.

"I read fast, too," said the Gurnee resident.

Thats good, because there are many authors who want her to read their books and then give her opinions of them.

Vickery has given her review to more than 700 books so far, highlighting what she calls the "cozy" books on a Web site she created called cozylibrary.com.

Vickery said she was meant to write, earning bachelor and masters degrees in journalism. When the company she worked for canceled her publications, she wanted to retire but continue writing.

For five years, she also worked as a cozy book reviewer for Mystery News, a publication in Door County, Wis. Vickery said she likes to share recommendations and decided that was an avenue to pursue further. So in February 2006, cozylibrary.com was born.

"I think for especially people who are pressed for time, they dont want to waste time on a book thats bad," she said.

The word "cozy" first described a specific type of mystery in 1958, such as something written by Agatha Christie. The books did not feature gore, violence, sex or curse words. She said that description can apply now to other genres.

"You are not going to have nightmares from it. You are going to feel good in the end," she said.

On average, cozylibrary.com receives 500 to 700 hits each day and has seen visitors from every state and 17 countries. Often visiting the site are school librarians who want to suggest a book without violence or sex for children who read beyond their grade level and are bored with childrens books. …

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