Couple Went Up a Mountain and Came Down Engaged; Heading for Trouble: Beth Davies and Stefan Senk, on Ben Nevis at the Start of Their Climb

The Evening Standard (London, England), January 13, 2009 | Go to article overview

Couple Went Up a Mountain and Came Down Engaged; Heading for Trouble: Beth Davies and Stefan Senk, on Ben Nevis at the Start of Their Climb


Byline: BENEDICT MOORE-BRIDGER

A COUPLE stranded on Britain's highest mountain overnight told today how they were rescued after texting a parent 550 miles away.

Stefan Senk, 29, was trapped with girlfriend Beth Davies, 25, for 18 hours more than 2,000 feet up the North face of Ben Nevis in gale force winds as temperatures fell below zero.

The couple, caught out by a challenging climb which left them no time to descend before dark, took shelter at 6pm in a narrow crevice overlooking a 1,000ft drop.

A storm blanked out any mobile phone signal and they had told no one the details of their climb.

Fearing it might be their last night together, Mr Senk proposed.

Miss Davies, from Hemel Hempsted, a researcher at Durham University, said: "We got very scared. We were huddled together on a rock face and all I could see was a wall of cloud and fog. The wind was so strong it shredded my blanket and we were close to hypothermia. …

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Couple Went Up a Mountain and Came Down Engaged; Heading for Trouble: Beth Davies and Stefan Senk, on Ben Nevis at the Start of Their Climb
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