Neighborhood Watch

By Dickinson, Elizabeth | Foreign Policy, January-February 2009 | Go to article overview

Neighborhood Watch


Dickinson, Elizabeth, Foreign Policy


When a rush of violence broke out last January after Kenya s presidential election, many wondered why it was so unexpected. Electoral rigging set off the attacks, but surely tensions simmered before. Could Kenya have seen the outburst coming and perhaps done something to prevent it?

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Prediction, at least, was possible--and Web-based nonprofit Ushahidi (Swahili for "testimony") did just that. Funded by grants and individual donations, Ushahidi had already developed software that allowed any mobile-phone user in Kenya to report incidents of community tension. "[T]here were a lot of rumors going around way before the violence," says Ushahidi's founder, Ory Okolloh.

Okolloh's group operates one of a growing number of conflict early warning systems that are springing up online. They work because they are simple and fast. An Ushahidi user, for example, sends details of turmoil by text or posts directly to ushahidi.com. Once a local NGO verifies the account, the incident gets entered into the Ushahidi database and plotted on a map, tagged with a description of the event and with space for pictures and video. In Kenya, reports of violence were texted back to local leaders, who could mediate community conflict. International observers could monitor the reports, too.

For years, creating an effective means of alerting the world to brewing conflicts has been the dream of humanitarians. …

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