My Father's Dream and the American Narrative; Martin Luther King's Son Reflects - an Inauguration Exclusive

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 19, 2009 | Go to article overview

My Father's Dream and the American Narrative; Martin Luther King's Son Reflects - an Inauguration Exclusive


Byline: Martin Luther King III, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

As I reflect on the meaning and importance of the inauguration of Barack Obama as the first African American to be elected president of our great nation, I am reminded of the dream of Martin Luther King and the African-American narrative, and how it parallels the American dream and the American narrative. As King's dream is rooted in the American dream, so is the African-American narrative rooted in the American narrative.

A peoples' narrative may be defined as a coherent arrangement of facts and myths explaining the group's past and present and embodying their hopes for the future.

Since slavery, African Americans have been constructing a narrative as a group that, much like my father's dream, is rooted in the ideal American narrative. Like the ideal American dream, the ideal American narrative tells of a nation whose ideals - its values and principles, it mores and norms - are the sacred substance of life and liberty, justice and equality, opportunity and responsibility.

The substance of the American dream is expressed in these sublime words: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

My father's dream is a profound, eloquent and unequivocal expression of a world where the dignity and worth of all human personality are its ideals. It is a dream of a nation where men of all races, colors and creeds live together as brothers - he added, or perish as fools.

Today, African Americans have the opportunity to shape the substance of its narrative and realize its full promise. Perhaps most striking is the main character in this chapter of that narrative: a black man who will serve as the most powerful person in the world.

But, let us not be confused. The president-elect is not the only writer of this narrative any more than he is the story's only character. Today, the African-American narrative will be written from the inkwells of all African Americans - our civil society, our business community, our political electeds and every citizen. The question is what will we - each of us - write?

The ideal answer is certain to be found in understanding and interpreting my father's dream narrative. His vision of its significance to the American dream itself saw that this nation could not realize its fullest potential unless each and every American has the untrammeled opportunity to fulfill his or her total individual capacity without regard to race, creed, color or any other qualifier. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

My Father's Dream and the American Narrative; Martin Luther King's Son Reflects - an Inauguration Exclusive
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.