Feathered Friends; for More Than a Decade, RSPB Cymru and Other Conservationists Have Been Sounding Alarm Bells over Declining Numbers of Many Birds of Farmed Habitats in Wales. Now the Conservation Charity Has Singled out 10 Farmers as Examples of the Many Who Consciously Manage Their Land with Wildlife in Mind. Farming Editor Steve Dube Reports

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), January 27, 2009 | Go to article overview

Feathered Friends; for More Than a Decade, RSPB Cymru and Other Conservationists Have Been Sounding Alarm Bells over Declining Numbers of Many Birds of Farmed Habitats in Wales. Now the Conservation Charity Has Singled out 10 Farmers as Examples of the Many Who Consciously Manage Their Land with Wildlife in Mind. Farming Editor Steve Dube Reports


Byline: Steve Dube

TEN Welsh farmers have been hailed as agri-environment heroes by the RSPB.

The farmers have been singled out for implementing wildlife-friendly measures to help once common birds such as the curlew and lapwing that the latest State of the Birds in Wales report warns could be lost from Welsh farmland over the next decade.

All have signed up to the Tir Gofal agri-environment scheme, which they say is vital in enabling them to achieve a balance between food production and environmental stewardship.

Dave Lamacraft, senior farmland bird advisory officer with the RSPB, said it was hard to select the top 10 out of the many farmers keen to help wildlife flourish on their land.

"These 10 farmers show what can be done for wildlife by combining their interest in wildlife and good farm business," he said.

"They set the standard for environmental practice in Wales."

Peter Davies of Slade Farm, Southerndown in the Vale of Glamorgan was an obvious choice, having won the pounds 1,000 RSPB Nature of Farming Award last year with 36% of the public poll.

Peter and his wife Rosamund have farmed the spectacular 335 hectares of coastal and clifftop farm for 30 years and converted to organic in 2000.

The mixed farm includes arable, beef, sheep and outdoor pigs. Stubble from spring cereals is left over winter, ponds and scrapes have been dug, wild bird cover is grown and there are stream-side corridors and wildlife corridors connecting woodlands.

The habitats support a wealth of wildlife, providing food in winter and spring, and safe nesting sites for declining birds such as skylarks, tree sparrows and yellowhammers.

Careful management on the farm has improved the land so well that choughs, which had been absent from Glamorgan for more than 100 years have returned to nest.

Other important wildlife includes great-crested newts, brown hares and lesser horseshoe bats.

"Farming is a wonderful and rewarding way of life, which requires a great deal of care and respect for nature," says Peter.

"The strength of my farm is that all the key elements - cattle, crops and wildlife - complement each other."

Richard and Lyn Anthony of Tythegston Farm, Bridgend, have been managing their 849-hectare lowland mixed farm since 1997 for sheep and arable crops.

The arable land is cultivated using minimum tillage techniques and includes spring beans and cereals, with stubble left over winter, and wildlife cover crops.

The Anthonys joined Tir Gofal in 2003 and the agreement includes a special project for lapwings.

Lapwing conservation is a key part of the farming system and influences many farm decisions.

Mustard is sown in early March at a light density to provide bare earth for lapwings to nest and some cover for the chicks.

Water levels have been raised in one of the grassland fields to provide chick rearing habitat.

"We get great enjoyment from seeing rare birds such as lapwings and skylarks thriving," said Richard.

Nigel and Karen Elgar of Cannon Farm, Welshpool, have run their 371-hectare upland beef and sheep farm since 1986. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Feathered Friends; for More Than a Decade, RSPB Cymru and Other Conservationists Have Been Sounding Alarm Bells over Declining Numbers of Many Birds of Farmed Habitats in Wales. Now the Conservation Charity Has Singled out 10 Farmers as Examples of the Many Who Consciously Manage Their Land with Wildlife in Mind. Farming Editor Steve Dube Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.