The World Wide Web ... on a TV near You: The Long-Awaited Internet Appliance Offers the Net without the PC

By Greene, Marvin V. | Black Enterprise, April 1997 | Go to article overview

The World Wide Web ... on a TV near You: The Long-Awaited Internet Appliance Offers the Net without the PC


Greene, Marvin V., Black Enterprise


Now playing in living rooms all across the country--the World Wide Web. Having proven its worth as a valuable business tool, technology firms are now trying to make the Internet as ubiquitous as television. In fact, several companies are trying to make it part or your television. Many marketers believe convergence of television and the Net will allow companies to recoup much of the vast amounts of cash that have been thrown at the World Wide Web by providing larger viewing audiences.

It is no wonder that technology companies want to bring the Internet to the home via television. While about 37% of U.S. homes have personal computers, more than 98% have television sets, according to IDC/Link, a New York City research firm. Companies are banking that WebTV, which lets you switch back and forth between the Internet and regular TV programs, will someday just be another way to watch and experience television. Consumer electronics giants, such as Sony Electronics and Philips, believe access to the Web, e-mail, chat rooms, online shopping malls and newsgroups are ripe for a major push into the home.

Both companies offer set-top Internet access boxes, similar to those needed for cable access, which combine with your television to provide access to the Internet-sans PC. These devices, called Internet appliances, are leading the Net's charge out of the home office and onto the television.

The first of these Internet appliances to reach the consumer market are the Sony WebTV Internet Terminal and the Philips Magnavox Internet Unit. Available in electronics and departments stores since September 1996, both devices, including set-top box and remote controls, cost $329.95. Heavy e-mail and newsgroup users will want to purchase the wireless keyboard for $69.95. Of course, you'll need to pay for access to the Internet. WebTV Networks is currently the only content provider for the set-top devices. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The World Wide Web ... on a TV near You: The Long-Awaited Internet Appliance Offers the Net without the PC
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.