Organizations Assisting People of Color in Graduate & Professional Studies

By Jackson, Cassandra N. | Diversity Employers, February 1997 | Go to article overview

Organizations Assisting People of Color in Graduate & Professional Studies


Jackson, Cassandra N., Diversity Employers


The challenge for 95% of the students interested in graduate and professional study is finding money - scholarships, fellowships, and grants. Finding money is especial difficult for students who don't know what monies are available or how and where to look for them.

African Americans, in particular, lack the information needed to identify these financial resources and, as a result, tend to think more about taking out a loan to pay for their education. If other sources are not available, you should consider a loan.

However, our hope is that you will use the information provided as a launching pad to find and secure free money for your graduate and professional studies.

The Black Collegian has compiled the following listing of some of the organizations assisting people of color interested in pursuing graduate and professional degrees in management, humanities, social sciences, physical sciences, natural sciences, mathematics, engineering, law, human resources, labor/industrial relations, material sciences, astronomy, computer science, geology, chemistry, and physics.

With some legwork and research, you should find a scholarship, fellowship, grant, or loan to support your graduate and professional study.

Organizations

Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC Pre-doctoral Clearinghouse)

803 East 8th Street

Indiana University

Bloomington, IN 47405

(812) 855-0822

Amount: $9,500 plus tuition (5 years)

Deadline(s): January 2

Field(s): Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering

Pre-doctoral fellowships for U.S. citizens of African American, American Indian, Mexican American, or Puerto Rican heritage. Must hold or expect to receive bachelor's degree by late summer from a regionally accredited college or university. Awards for specified university in IL, IN, IA, MI, MN, OH, WI, PA. Write for details.

Consortium for Graduate Study in Management

200 S. Hanley Road, Suite 1102

St. Louis, MO 63105

(314) 935-5614

Amount: Full tuition and fees; second-year support contingent upon satisfactory progress in the first year.

Deadline(s): December 1, early decision; February 1, final deadline.

Must be a U.S. citizen certifying membership in one of the following minority groups: African-American, Native-American, or Hispanic; must qualify for admission to a Consortium MBA program. Basis of award is applicant's desire to study management, proven aptitude, ability and scholarship.

Earl Warren Legal Training Program (Scholarships)

99 Hudson Street, 16th Floor

New York, NY 10013

(212) 219-1900

Amount: Varies

Deadline(s): March 15

Field(s): Law

Scholarships for entering Black law students. Emphasis on law students who plan to practice Civil Rights or Public Interest law. U.S. citizens or legal resident. Write for complete information.

Florida Endowment Education Fund

201 E. Kennedy Blvd., Suite 1525

Tampa, FL 33602

(813) 272-2772

Amount: $11,000 stipend plus $5,000 tuition and fees (per year)

Deadline(s): January 15

Field(s): All fields (except law, medicine, and education)

Open to all African-Americans with at least a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution who wish to pursue a doctoral degree. Program recruits nationwide; however, fellows must enroll in a Florida institution. U.S. citizen. 25 awards per year. Renewable for up to 5 years. Students must write to request application.

Industrial Relations Council on Graduate Opportunities, Advanced Level Studies (GOALS Minority Fellowship for Graduate School)

P.O. Box 4363

East Lansing, MI 48826

(517) 351-6122

Amount: Up to full tuition plus stipend

Deadline(s): April 1

Field(s): Labor/Industrial Relations; Human Resources

Open to African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, Native Alaskans, and Native Hawaiians for graduate study in the above areas at a member university of the GOALS consortium. …

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