A Mind to Remember

By McDonald, Alyssa | New Statesman (1996), January 12, 2009 | Go to article overview

A Mind to Remember


McDonald, Alyssa, New Statesman (1996)


Joshua Foer

Writer and USA Memory Champion

If you were looking for evidence of a literary gene, the three Foer brothers' collective CV would be a persuasive place to start. Jonathan Safran Foer, the middle sibling, is a celebrated Brooklyn-based novelist while the eldest brother, Franklin, is editor of the New Republic and author of How Football Explains the World. Now there is the youngest Foer, Joshua. His first book, Moonwalking With Einstein, an examination of "the art and science of memory", is not published until this autumn. But the buzz about it has been growing since 2006, when, at the age of 23, he received an advance of $1.2m on the strength of his proposal.

The film rights were also sold long ago. It may be only a small way of changing the world, but Foer's exploration of our ability to recollect experiences and abstract ideas will raise important questions about the function of memory, and its role in a society where mass publishing and wireless internet can do so much of its work.

By the time the bidding war started, Foer--a Yale-educated science journalist also based in Brooklyn--was already writing for the New York Times, the Washington Post and the online current affairs magazine Slate. Moonwalking began as a short article for Slate about the USA Memory Championships, a peculiar event at which "mental athletes" compete with one another to recall 300-digit binary numbers and the order of packs of shuffled cards. Foer describes it as "less clash of the Titans than revenge of the nerds". But while observing the event, he became interested by the competitors' insistence that they weren't naturally gifted, but had used mnemonic techniques to hone their skills of recall. So he entered the championship-"as a sort of exercise in participatory journalism"-and won, breaking US records for memorisation at the same time.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"I became a little bit obsessed with my memory training," he explains. The technique he used is a window on to a preliterate culture of memory. As he explained in his original piece for Slate, the human mind is best equipped to retain memories of real objects, so by associating abstract ideas with vivid spatial and visual images, it becomes easier to memorise swaths of them. …

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