Letters in the Editor's Mailbag

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), January 23, 2009 | Go to article overview

Letters in the Editor's Mailbag


Byline: The Register-Guard

Sudden pain relief

Funny, when I woke up Wednesday morning that pain in the neck that I've had for the past eight years had gone.

Go figure.

Ken Molly

Eugene

Heed Coolidge's words on taxes

One reason responsible middle class taxpayers are squeezed so hard is the extraordinary cost of government with a very low return on their money - as evidenced by high crime rates, potholes, wasteful defense spending and many social programs that do little more than subsidize irresponsible behavior.

Here's part of what President Calvin Coolidge, "Silent Cal," said on Dec. 3, 1924, in his State of the Union address:

"The fallacy of the claim that the costs of government are borne by the rich and those who make a direct contribution to the national treasury can not be too often exposed.

"No system has been devised, I do not think any system could be devised, under which any person living in this country could escape being affected by the cost of our government. It has a direct effect both upon the rate and the purchasing power of wages. It is felt in the price of those prime necessities of existence, food, clothing, fuel and shelter.

"It would appear to be elementary that the more the government expends, the more it must require every producer to contribute out of his production to the public treasury, and the less he will have for his own benefit. The continuing costs of public administration can be met in only one way - by the work of the people.

"The higher they become, the more the people must work for the government. The less they are, the more the people can work for themselves."

Greg Williams

Noti

Odds favor capital R `Reality'

Not since Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh have I seen so many starry-eyed groupies so willing to hand over their money and their lives to a silver- tongued reformist based on nebulous promises of Hope, with a capital H, for a happier life.

Fifty-three percent of American voters recently elected a new occupant for that very reason, and he's now officially the current occupant.

So now that all the Hope hype has tapered off to a dull roar, it's time for Hope to climb into the ring with capital R "Reality" for what's billed to be the match of the century. Undefeated Reality is a heavy favorite over the inexperienced challenger Hope.

It could end up ugly, as Hope is definitely no Rocky Balboa.

Indeed, it appears Hope's chickens have come home to roost. After years of despicable low blows against the former occupant, we'll now see if Hope can absorb Reality's crushing right hooks to the chin.

Previous Reality opponents say to watch for the white towel from Hope's corner in the early rounds.

Well, wish for the best, sports fans. But don't forget: If wishes were horses, beggars would ride.

Don Richey

Eugene

Great recital added to the day

The Jan. 20 inauguration always will remain in our minds and hearts. Another event at Beall Concert Hall will also.

Martin Neary, England's renowned organist, played a recital with Amy Goeser Kolb, University of Oregon faculty oboe and English horn artist.

The strength and beauty of J.S. Bach's and other composer's music seemed a tribute to the day and future. The organ in Beall Hall - with its impressive banks of pipes - rarely is heard, and the blending of the different tonal qualities of the oboe and organ were amazing.

Neary gave much help to the participants and students in the ensuing master class. Many thanks to the artists and the UO School of Music and Dance for the experience.

Julieanne Underwood

Mapleton

Evict the fuddy-duddies

Being retired, I spent the day watching the inauguration and celebrations in Washington, D.C. It was inspiring! …

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