Federal Funds Help Baxley, Ga. Battle Regional Crime

By Baxley, Hilton | Nation's Cities Weekly, April 14, 1997 | Go to article overview

Federal Funds Help Baxley, Ga. Battle Regional Crime


Baxley, Hilton, Nation's Cities Weekly


The City of Baxley Georgia is one of Georgia's many small municipalities, with a population of about 4,500. Baxley was the first site of a commercial turpentine distillery in Georgia back in 1858, and today it is the only one in the United States that still operates commercially. Because of the uniqueness of our industry and an increased interest in promoting Baxley's heritage, last year the City changed its logo, slogan and image to "The Turpentine City: Better than Bigger."

Another change we intend to achieve, however, goes beyond image. Baxley is also battling the "war on drugs."

The notion that "unemployment breeds crime and drugs reinforce it" has become a reality in our City despite longtime efforts to combine forces of community programs and local agencies. With unemployment and crime on the rise, we were forced to start looking for alternative ways to supplement our staff in the Police Department.

The Rood to Expanded Resources

In late 1993, we explored President Clinton's Crime Bill as a means to supplement our police manpower.

In mid-1994 Baxley prepared and submitted a grant proposal application to the COPS office. On October 12, 1994 the City Police Chief James Godfrey and I were honored to attend a grant awards ceremony on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, D.C., conducted by President Clinton and Attorney General Reno.

The first installment in President Clinton's promise to put 100,000 new police officers on the streets awarded two hundred million dollars in grants. Of this amount, $180,056 was awarded to the City of Baxley to hire three additional uniformed police officers for a period of three years. They were assigned to work the housing projects, so that we could man the new police sub station 24 hours a day. These officers, with others, began efforts to "clean-up" our seven projects by joining with the citizens, and especially those who live in the projects.

The second phase of funding for the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 began in late 1994. Under this program, called COPS Fast, we decided to submit a grant application for one new police officer on behalf of the City of Baxley and the Baxley Housing Authority. In early 1995 we were awarded $84,791 and hired one officer for three years. These four officers began to reach the residents through weekly meetings, going door-to-door, giving lectures to parents and kids about "saying no to drugs." They also encouraged local participation and welcomed public input.

In mid 1995 the next step in the Department of Justice efforts to work with communities across the country was announced. The COPS Universal Hiring Program--dubbed Troops to COPS--is a program developed jointly by the Department of Justice and the Department of Defense to encourage the hiring of recently separated members of the armed forces as law enforcement officers. Since two of our recently hired officers were veterans, the City once again seized the opportunity to apply for another grant under the COPS Program. We were awarded $8,000 under this grant, as reimbursement for training expenses for the two officers, including attendance at our State Police Academy.

Funds Create Regional Task Force

With these new officers in place and doing a great job, we unfortunately found that we were running all the drug dealers out of the housing projects and into other areas of the City creating an entirely different problem. Various other Chiefs and Sheriffs met to discuss this now mutual problem and agree on a regional solution that incorporated the affected cities and counties.

We applied for another grant under the State of Georgia Edward Byrne Memorial Formula Grant Program. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Federal Funds Help Baxley, Ga. Battle Regional Crime
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.