An Invitation to Run against the Single Currency: Chirac's Call for New Elections Has Put the Central Issue of Europe before the Voters

By Elliott, Michael | Newsweek, May 5, 1997 | Go to article overview

An Invitation to Run against the Single Currency: Chirac's Call for New Elections Has Put the Central Issue of Europe before the Voters


Elliott, Michael, Newsweek


Chirac's call for new elections has put the central issue' of Europe before the voters. Who benefits?

IT IS AN UNUSUAL POLITICIAN WHO, when his supporters control 80 percent of the seats in the national parliament, decides to call fresh elections long before he needs to. Especially when his government is unpopular. Jacques Chirac, the president of France, has done just that.

Why take such a gamble?

Because the French state is being restructured in preparation for the rigors of European Monetary Union, due to be introduced in 1999. To be in the first wave of countries to use the single currency, nations have to reduce their budget deficits to no more than 8 percent of GDP. Chirac's government has slashed subsidies and benefits; but France has an unemployment rate of nearly 18 percent, so this has been roundly hated. Now the president seeks a new mandate for yet more austerity, in elections whose first round will be in late May.

"We've got to let the people he heard again," said Chirac in an address last week, "so they eau state their position clearly."

Admirable: but what if the people reply to this invitation with some Gallic phrase unprintable in a family magazine? That would then prove that the gap between popular and elite sentiment on the future development of Europe had become dangerously large; reverberations would echo around the Continent. For the establishments of Germany, France, most of the other Continental nations-- and for a chunk of the British one, too-- "Europe" has become a fixation. Only ties that bind the countries of the European Union ever closer together, it is said, can stop Germany from dominating the Continent once more. The best available tie is a single currency. So it has become an article of faith that the new currency, or euro, must he introduced on schedule. All of which has a flaw: it's not certain that ordinary voters are on board.

In Britain, the issue has dominated the last weeks of the general-election campaign. John Major, the beleaguered prime minister, got a lift in the polls when he adopted a more Euro-skeptic line. Tony Blair, leader of the Labour Party, went into rapid-response mode. "I am a British patriot," he said. "I will always put the interests of my country first."

Other Europeans have come to expect the British to wrap themselves in the Union Jack. But what if the Germans, champion Euro-fanatics, had a rethink about the future? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An Invitation to Run against the Single Currency: Chirac's Call for New Elections Has Put the Central Issue of Europe before the Voters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.