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Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 14, 2009 | Go to article overview

Fence Post


Why donEt Obama appointees pay tax?

Why do so many of President ObamaEs appointees have tax problems? Tom Daschle owed $128,203 in back taxes and $11,964 in interest to the IRS, and Nancy Killefer was hit with a $964.69 tax lien on her home from the District of Columbia for failure to pay unemployment taxes for household help. The most incredible tax cheat of all was Timothy Geithner, ObamaEs choice to run the IRS, who neglected to pay $34,000 in income taxes to the IRS. What a fine example for us taxpayers. IEve always thought the Democrats loved taxes. Evidently they donEt like to pay taxes like the rest of us, but they take perverse pleasure in imposing taxes on others.

Robert Graham

Naperville

Roskam back to same old GOP lines

ItEs great to see a public servant like Peter Roskam communicating to his constituents through the newspaper. I wish more of our representatives would take the time to do so. I also think it would be great if the "unbiased" paper would point out the inaccuracies in what Mr. Roskam says, e.g. that Republicans were not consulted about the stimulus bill (not true), that the bill is all pork and not creating jobs (also untrue). It would also be fun to see some commentary about how Mr. Roskam voted in lock-step with Bush, arguing in favor of everything that administration wanted, but at election time he put Barack ObamaEs pictures all over his campaign literature, saying that they were on the same team, and anyone who liked Obama should vote for Roskam. Now that everyoneEs in office, Roskam votes against Obama, argues over minor details, repeats the standard-issue Republican talking points. Now, thatEs comedy. Or is it tragedy?

Vicky FitzMaurice

Villa Park

Former Gov. Edgar took the el, too

I read your story, "No first-class expectations," about Gov. Pat Quinn flying on United Airlines. Wow, how jaded Illinoisans have become. Former Gov. Jim Edgar flew commercial aircraft to Washington and New York from Chicago, too. Moreover, Edgar took the Blue Line el (no state police car) regularly from OEHare to his Loop office in the Thompson Center.

Kirk W. Dillard

Illinois state senator

R-Naperville

Corruption begins at grass-roots level

Illinois has several laws and regulation sets, which if followed closely by public governing bodies go a long way toward promising honesty in government. These are the Illinois Open Meetings Act, the Illinois Freedom of Information Act, and the Illinois Municipal Code. The first two are relatively brief, tend to be in plain English and have straightforward objectives that state they are the policy of governance in this state. The latter is long, hard to find, difficult to understand, and the interpretation of it is expensive to secure and sets rules of procedure for governmental bodies. Simultaneously, the court system and the Illinois Attorney General have taken a largely "hands off" stance toward enforcing the laws and rules, in an effort to allow local governing bodies autonomy in governance. Thus, they have rarely had their conduct held to the standards or spirit of the legislation. It has been trusted that elected officials and governing bodies will "do the right thing" in reference to them as they govern. When governing bodies do their best to comply, open and transparent government happens under the sunshine of day. However, when officials and governing bodies attempt to circumvent the laws and regulations, the result is obscure, confusing or secret governance, which is the breeding ground for corruption. …

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