Life after Daschle

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 17, 2009 | Go to article overview

Life after Daschle


Byline: Sean Lengell, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Life after Daschle

When Tom Daschle's highly publicized tax problems derailed his bid to become secretary of health and human services two weeks ago, it slammed the breaks on the momentum of one of President Obama's biggest campaign promises - health care coverage for all Americans.

No potential HHS candidate has emerged yet who has inspired the excitement and passion many health care reform advocates - both on and off Capitol Hill - expressed for Mr. Daschle.

When Mr. Obama nominated Mr. Daschle for the HHS post in November, Ron Pollack, executive director of the liberal health care advocacy group Families USA, called the decision the best news possible for those who want to achieve meaningful health care reform.

While the administration reportedly is vetting Democratic Govs. Kathleen Sebelius of Kansas and Phil Bredesen of Tennessee for the Cabinet post, neither has the near universal support health care advocates gave to Mr. Daschle's nomination.

Mr. Daschle's tax mistakes are regrettable, said Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus, Montana Democrat, earlier this month. But his tax mistakes do not change his qualifications to lead on health care reform.

Mr. Daschle in many ways was the perfect person to fill the important post. The South Dakota Democrat is well-versed on the health care reform debate, even having written a book on the issue. As a former Senate majority and minority leader, he was well-tuned to the rhythms of Capitol Hill, and was well-liked by his former colleagues of both parties.

Women's health care needs fix, lawmakers say

Democrats Rep. Jan Schakowsky of Illinois and Sen. Debbie Stabenow of Michigan last week introduced legislation calling on Congress to improve the health care situation of women.

The sense of Congress resolution, which would request that Congress draft legislation within 18 months that guarantees access to health care for women and all individuals is nonbinding. Still, Mrs. Schakowsky said the measure is important because it would hold Capitol Hill lawmakers accountable for improving the lives of women, who studies show receive unequal medical attention compared with men. …

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