Best Newspaper Promotions

Editor & Publisher, May 3, 1997 | Go to article overview

Best Newspaper Promotions


Dagens Nyheter, Stockholm, Sweden, won the best of show award in the 62nd annual Editor & Publisher/ International Newspaper Marketing Association Awards competition. The awards recognize the best advertising, promotion and public relations programs of newspapers throughout the world.

The Irish Times, Dublin, Ireland, won for best copywriting; OONachrichten, Linz., Austria, won for best graphic design; and the Los Angeles Times won the results-driven "Bottom Line"Award.

The Bakersfield Californian garnered the most awards with four firsts and three seconds. Denver's Rocky Mountain News took one first- and five second-places. Newspapers winning a total of five awards each include the Lexington (Ky.) Herald-Leader, OONachrichten, and Los Angeles Times.

Those winning four awards each were Indianapolis Newspapers; the Northwest Herald, Crystal Lake, Ill.; and the Philadelphia Inquirer.

The awards won by the Indianapolis papers, Inquirer, Herald-Leader, and OONachrichten, include three first prizes.

Other newspapers winning three first prizes include the Telegraph Herald in Dubuque, Iowa; El Pais of Montevideo, Uraguay; and Prensa Libre of Guatemala.

More than 1,500 entries were received from newspapers in 28 countries, and in a record 11 languages -- all competing for awards in 18 categories within four circulation groups.

The first round of judging by local publishing and marketing executives took place Feb. 10 in Houston. Finalists were judged by Los Angeles-area advertising, marketing and public relations executives at Times Mirror Co.'s Harry Chandler Auditorium on Feb. 25.

First-round judges included: Dean Aitken, advertising promotion manager, Houston Chronicle; Debra Alward, marketing director, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; Dallas Baker, art director, Rives Carlberg, Houston; Trey Click, manager, Houston Creative Connections; Bart Darling, associate creative director, BRSG Inc., Houston; Brad Follis, president, Idea Advertising Group, Houston; Mike Hagan, marketing director, YMCA of Greater Houston; Sue Jackson, CEO, Houston Creative Connection; Rhonda Kalata, creative manager, Houston Chronicle; Bob Livermore, marketing director, Buzz 107.5; Penny Morrison, principal, Morrison Design & Advertising; Jay Mower, professor of advertising, University of Houston; Kerry Otto, art director, Rives Carlberg; Bernadette Payne, graphic designer, Houston; Raphaele, principal, Digital Photography, Houston; Jerry Sagehorn, marketing director, Astrodome USA, Houston; Steve Shaw, director of research, Media General, Richmond, Va.; Justin Smith, senior artist, Houston Chronicle; Rick Stein, senior artist, Houston Chronicle; Mike Weber, operations manager, Space Center Houston; and Brian White, artist, BW Illustration, Houston.

Judges of the finalists included: Mel Abert, president, Abert/Poindexter Agency, Hermosa Beach, Calif; Joni Brice, CEO, Heil-Brice Retail Advertising, Newport Beach, Calif.; Scott Franey, director of marketing, Princess Cruises, Los Angeles; John H.B. French, CEO, Pasadena Tournament of Roses Association; Jorge Jackson, vice president of public affairs, GTECA Inc., Thousand Oaks, Calif.; Tom Lehr, senior vice president, Dailey & Associates Advertising, Los Angeles; David Mace, division vice president, TMP Worldwide, Los Angeles; David Marchese, president and creative director, Marchese Communications, Santa Monica, Calif.; Norma Oref, co-chair, La Agencia de Oref & Asociados, Los Angeles; Boni Peluso, president, Peluso Creative Recruitment, Pasadena, Calif.; Tom Reilly, journalism department chairman, California State University, Northridge; Kristine Shattuck, regional marketing manager, Southwest Airlines, Los Angeles; Archie Thornton, international management director, Ogilvy & Mather, Los Angeles; and Jim Watterson; vice president, public relations, Robinsons-May, North Hollywood, Calif.

Winning newspapers will be recognized for their achievements at a luncheon during the annual INMA conference being held this week in Los Angeles. …

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