Professional Development Schools Can Revitalize Teacher Education

By Campoy, Renee | USA TODAY, May 1997 | Go to article overview

Professional Development Schools Can Revitalize Teacher Education


Campoy, Renee, USA TODAY


Educators finally are recognizing that hands-on, supervised field experiences are better preparation for prospective teachers than "book knowledge" taught in college classrooms.

Sometimes, stupid ideas persist in spite of common wisdom to the contrary. Because they are cheap and easy to administer, schools of education have perpetuated traditional teacher education programs whereby novice teachers are isolated on college campuses away from their purpose of study--real children in real schools. The professional development school (PDS) as a model of teacher education reform could change this with common-sense solutions to training the next generation of teachers.

For decades, demands have been made to reform the American education system. Usually, elementary and secondary education have been the objects of these efforts. For instance, in the 1 980s, the Reagan Administration produced A Nation at Risk in an effort to create higher educational standards, and, in the 1990s, Presidents George Bush and Bill Clinton promoted Goals 2000 for the same end. More recently, higher education, particularly teacher education, has been targeted for reform.

Educators are beginning to realize that changes in kindergarten through 12th-grade education will not be effective when many novice teachers still are trained in traditional, campus-bound programs where course work has been separated from actual teaching experiences by time and distance. In some, this means that an education student may not work with children until the final semester of a four-year program for student teaching.

In comparable examples from industry and medicine, who would want to fly with a pilot who only had listened to lectures and taken tests without actually flying a plane? Who would want to be examined by physicians who lacked supervised experiences with patients as part of their training? Consumers would not stand for this, yet they tolerate the ineffective education of teachers. Expecting novice teachers to be qualified in the classroom is silly when their "book knowledge" can not be practiced and tested for effectiveness within a classroom. Educators finally are recognizing that common sense should prevail when it comes to including hands-on, extended, supervised field experiences in teacher education programs. Many teacher training institutions are taking a look at reform initiatives that may provide this.

The professional development school is one of the most prominent and compelling models of this type of teacher education reform. The PDS proposes to reorganize and renew teacher training programs by engaging specially selected public schools in a long-term relationship with a local college or university's teacher training. This type of synergy helps both institutions do more than each could do on its own. Many teacher training institutions across the country already are embracing this model. According to the ERIC Clearinghouse, more than 300 PDSs are operating across the country.

To those not in the field of education, it would seem obvious to conduct teacher training in schools. Often, though, new methods of teacher training are resisted by faculty members who prefer to teach on campus insulated from the practical realities of their profession. This notwithstanding, PDS programs are producing evidence that novice teachers learn more about teaching when their course materials are presented in conjunction with assignments working with children. It has been found that such a method provides powerful and effective feedback to the novice teacher during lessons when the pupils are bored, frustrated, indifferent, or happily engaged. In these cases, novice teachers do not have to be told that their lessons are poor; the children do that with their actions. Then, the teacher can move to the more complex problem of how to improve the lesson.

In addition to working with kids, novice teachers observe and interact with experienced classroom teachers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Professional Development Schools Can Revitalize Teacher Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.