Konigsburg, Wisniewski Books Win Newberry, Caldecott Medals

American Libraries, April 1997 | Go to article overview

Konigsburg, Wisniewski Books Win Newberry, Caldecott Medals


Winners of the Newbery and Caldecott medals, considered the most prestigious achievement awards for children's literature, were announced at a February 17 Midwinter Meeting press conference sponsored by ALA's Association for Library Service to Children.

Attracting an auditorium's worth of spectators each year, the event has been dubbed the Oscars of children's literature - an appellation ALSC President Steve Herb turned on its head by announcing March 24 as the date the "Newberys of film" would be presented in Hollywood.

E. L. Konigsburg's The View from Saturday won the 76th Newbery Award for the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children published in 1996. The book was published by Jean Karl/Atheneum.

A second-time winner, Konigsburg was awarded the Newbery Medal in 1968 for From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, the same year she won an Honor Book award for Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth. She is the only author to receive both awards in the same year.

The Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children went to David Wisniewski (who attended the press conference) for Golem, published by Clarion Books.

The next morning, Konigsburg and Wisniewski joined ALA President Mary Somerville on the Today show's New York set to discuss the significance of the awards. Their television appearance (Somerville jetted back to Washington late Tuesday morning) was the culmination of several years' worth of increasing media attention about the medals. Previous coverage has included numerous newspaper articles and Today segments highlighting the winning titles.

Asked by co-host Katie Couric why the medals are "so vitally important," Somerville explained their competitiveness "creates distinguished and excellent literature for children."

Reminded that her two Newbery winners were written almost 30 years apart, Konigsburg said that youngsters' longing for "acceptance for being themselves, for being different" doesn't change. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Konigsburg, Wisniewski Books Win Newberry, Caldecott Medals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.