America's True Investment Advisors: Today's Bailouts May Be Vital, but, for Our Future's Sake, Congress Should Also Consider Investing in and Harnessing Educators on the Front Line

By Robinson, Torrance | District Administration, February 2009 | Go to article overview

America's True Investment Advisors: Today's Bailouts May Be Vital, but, for Our Future's Sake, Congress Should Also Consider Investing in and Harnessing Educators on the Front Line


Robinson, Torrance, District Administration


AS OUR SCHOOLS FACE DRACONIAN budgets cuts, there are two critical ways in which Washington can help: by investing in our schools and by harnessing the insight and will of our educators.

According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, in FY2009 and FY2010, 44 states face estimated budget shortfalls totaling $234 billion. Approximately one-third of that money, or $78 billion, was intended for education.

This is a lot of money. And the $700 billion bailout package (the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act) has gone to companies considered "too big to let fail." The proposed $850 billion stimulus package is focused on creating jobs. Although it may have an incidental effect on education budgets, it is not the direct investment that our schools need.

An Unequivocal Choice

So $78 billion, a mere 5 percent of the two currently proposed packages, is needed to stabilize our schools for FY2009 and FY2010. And unlike the money given to AIG ($80b), Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac ($25b), and Bear Stearns and JP Morgan ($29b), this money would be an investment in our future, not a bailout. Washington needs to make an informed financial commitment to our schools today.

This investment is not optional. We know the critical impact that education has on our economy, equality and ability to compete on a global stage. In The Race between Education and Technology, Harvard professors Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz show that the "American Century" was the direct result of our investment in education over the last hundred years. Sadly, their analysis confirms that, since the 1970s, we have been on an educational attainment decline that is leading to a declining middle class, loss in productivity, and inability to compete with other nations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

America's True Investment Advisors: Today's Bailouts May Be Vital, but, for Our Future's Sake, Congress Should Also Consider Investing in and Harnessing Educators on the Front Line
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.