Festival Time in Gambia; Twenty Years after 'Roots,' a Country Invites African Americans Home

By Gite, Lloyd | Black Enterprise, June 1997 | Go to article overview

Festival Time in Gambia; Twenty Years after 'Roots,' a Country Invites African Americans Home


Gite, Lloyd, Black Enterprise


When Alex Haley wrote his best-selling novel, Roots, two decades ago this year, it focused international attention on The Gambia. Haley traced his roots back to the small West African country where his great-great-grandfather Kunta Kinte was captured more than 200 years ago and brought to America as a slave.

And now Gambian tourism officials are inviting African Americans to The Gambia for the Second International "Roots Homecoming" Festival, June 14-21. The festival will include dancing workshops, drumming sessions, fashion shows, gospel festivals, wrestling matches and a film festival. All the activities are designed to focus renewed attention on the country.

"Alex Haley told me himself, before his death, that he wanted this kind of festival to occur here in The Gambia," says Bakari Sidibe, chairman of the Roots Homecoming organizing committee. "The inspiration for the festival was Roots. The book and the miniseries opened the eyes of everyone around the world. We want to build on that."

"We have been promoting The Gambia as a beach and sunshine destination," explains Susan Waffa-Ogoo, Secretary of State for Tourism and Culture."But we want to push it as a cultural destination as well because we have another asset, our people. The Roots Festival is based on the concept of cultural tourism. This festival is a way of getting people together from different cultural backgrounds and countries."

Those attending the weeklong festival can also take in the sites and sounds of The Gambia, which has a population of about 1.2 million and is considered one of Africa's smallest independent countries.

Much of the festival activities will occur in Banjul, the nation's capital. While there, make it a point to visit the market where you'll find great bargains on wood carvings and African clothing. To see how tie-dyed fabrics and batiks are made, stop by Mrs. …

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