Emotions Play a Useful Role in Managing Organizations

By Bird, Anat | American Banker, June 11, 1997 | Go to article overview

Emotions Play a Useful Role in Managing Organizations


Bird, Anat, American Banker


I hesitated before writing this article. It is prudent for a woman to avoid being associated with emotionalism in the business world. After all, the stereotype is that women are too emotional to be successful in business and that only tough, unemotional people survive in the business environment.

Recognizing the risk, I would like to offer the perspective that leadership capacity includes a wide spectrum of emotions. Emotional capacity can be equally as important as rational thinking, even in the "business case decision-making" environment so crucial to organizational success. Trust, a collaborative environment, and a spirit that is conducive to human innovation can mobilize a company to achieve its strategic goals.

Although excessive emotion can disrupt reasoning and displace analysis, some studies suggest that too little emotion can be even more devastating to an organization. Properly recognized emotions help management. They allow people to use both the right and left sides of their brains.

Let's consider the role of emotions in the workplace today. The conventional wisdom is that displaying emotion is a sign of weakness. In other words, the businessplace is no place to show feelings. Emotions are to be avoided because they send mixed signals and confuse the audience. Emotional people are not good managers and must be treated with caution. Only rational thinking is relevant to decision-making, and using emotional words may be detrimental to one's career.

Now let's take a different viewpoint. Consider emotions instead as a way to foster high performance by touching people's hearts in addition to their heads. In many high-performing organizations, emotions are a sign of strength. They are essential in business, since business is dependent on people, and people have feelings. Feelings trigger productivity, learning, and commitment.

Emotions can be used to clarify, not confuse, the issue. Though "gut feelings" alone are an insufficient and possibly dangerous base for decision-making, ignoring intuition is usually bad business. When supported with the right analysis, good intuition can develop into a sixth sense, as any effective bond trader or bank CEO will tell you. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Emotions Play a Useful Role in Managing Organizations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.