SebeliusAE Task: Reform Health Care

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 3, 2009 | Go to article overview

SebeliusAE Task: Reform Health Care


Byline: Associated Press

WASHINGTON u President Barack ObamaAEs choice to lead the Health and Human Services Department has a history of bucking the insurance industry, which faces the biggest hit under ObamaAEs initial health care reform plan.

Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius gets her introduction to the reform debate at a White House summit Obama will convene on Thursday.

Obama introduced Sebelius on Monday as his choice to run HHS, including overseeing Medicare and Medicaid, the twin government health programs for the elderly and the poor. Their spiraling costs threaten to bankrupt the country.

The 60-year-old, second-term governor has cultivated an image as someone who stands up to insurers.

She was state insurance commissioner in 2001 when Indianapolis-based Anthem Insurance Cos. Inc. offered to buy Blue Cross-Blue Shield of Kansas for $190 million as it sought to expand its holdings nationwide. It promised to maintain coverage levels.

Sebelius blocked the deal in February 2002 after concluding that premiums would rise under AnthemAEs ownership. She prevailed when the stateAEs highest court overturned a lower court ruling that she had exceeded her authority by rejecting the offer.

Later that year, Sebelius made her decision against the merger a central component of her campaign for governor, using it to help craft her image as a staunch consumer advocate who would stand up to powerful special interests.

As the nationAEs health secretary, Sebelius likely will face a similar, but bigger fight; pushing through the changes Obama outlined in the 2010 budget he released last week. It calls for setting aside $634 billion over 10 years as a down payment on health care overhaul.

About half the sum would come from spending cuts in government health programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid.

But the biggest cut of all u nearly $177 billion u would come from reducing payments to private insurance plans now serving about 10 million Medicare recipients, about one-fourth of the seniors and disabled people enrolled in the programs.

"Health care reform that reduces costs while expanding coverage is no longer just a dream we hope to achieve. ItAEs a necessity we have to achieve," Obama said in the East Room of the White House as he introduced Sebelius.

Sebelius told Obama she shares his belief "that we canAEt fix the economy without fixing health care."

Obama also announced that he had chosen Nancy-Ann DeParle to run the White House Office for Health Reform. DeParle was a health policy figure during the Clinton administration.

Sebelius is subject to Senate confirmation; DeParle is not.

Both posts were to be filled by Tom Daschle, the former longtime senator from South Dakota. But Obama was left searching for replacements after Daschle withdrew from consideration about a month ago after disclosing he failed to pay $140,000 in taxes and interest. …

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