London's Brave New Globe: Shakespeare's Original Theater Is Re-Created at Last

By Kroll, Jack | Newsweek, June 23, 1997 | Go to article overview

London's Brave New Globe: Shakespeare's Original Theater Is Re-Created at Last


Kroll, Jack, Newsweek


Shakespeare's original theater is re-created at last

I'M SORRY, YOU CAN'T GO TO THE LOO before the queen arrives," says the usher. You don't hear that on Broadway. Last week the theater officially called Shakespeare's Globe had its gala opening in London. Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip arrived in true Elizabethan fashion-by royal barge on the Thames. The reconstruction of the sacred shrine of English theater, the original Globe built in 1599, took four years and cost $13 million. Mark Rylance, the 36-year-old artistic director of the Globe company, rolled the theater "revolutionary."

There's no doubt the new Globe is a marvel of research and craftsmanship. It's the second coming of Shakespeare's famous "wooden O." The theater is open to the sky and enclosed by a 20-sided polygon of green oak, plastered with ground limestone and goat's hair; it boasts the first thatched roof in London since the Great Fire of 1666. The original Globe burned down in 1613 and was rebuilt, only to be closed in 1642 by Oliver Cromwell's party-pooper Puritan government and later dismantled. The new theater is a splendid and emotionally moving structure. But can a revolution take place in a reproduction of a 400-year-old theater?

Time will tell. Last week nearly 1,000 people seated on benches in three covered galleries-and 500 "groundlings" standing in front of the stage-saw chunks of the Globe's first two productions, "Henry V" and "The Winter's Tale." "Henry" was directed by Richard Olivier, Laurence's son. It seemed as if he and Rylance, who played Henry, were trying for the antithesis of Laurence Olivier's great 1944 film of "Henry V," with its triumphal jingoism. Rylance gave the St. Crispin speech before the battie of Agincourt with a prayerlike humility--the opposite of Olivier's thrilling cannon-voiced delivery. David Freeman's staging of "Winter's Tale" conjured up the magic and myth in this fable of jealousy redeemed and love reborn.

Richard Olivier, 35, is an experienced director, but amazingly "Henry" is his first Shakespeare. He admits he felt overshadowed by his titanic father: "I was deliberately avoiding Shakespeare for 10 years as a director." He identifies with the Henry story because it's like his own, "the young son stepping out from his father's shadow to pursue his own destiny. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

London's Brave New Globe: Shakespeare's Original Theater Is Re-Created at Last
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.