In These Times

By Reid, Stuart | The American Conservative, March 9, 2009 | Go to article overview

In These Times


Reid, Stuart, The American Conservative


A long, long time ago, when I was only 44, I spent a week in New York hawking around a dummy for a new daily newspaper to take on the New York Times. It's a good thing you are only young once.

I had the support of one or two hopeless romantics, perhaps none more hopelessly romantic than my friend Andrei Navrozov, a Russian who had recently arrived in London as a "cultural refugee" from the United States, where his family had fled in 1972 as political refugees.

Andrei, who now lives in Palermo as a "gastronomic refugee," had a fastidious dislike of the NYT, inherited, like much of his baggage, from his father Lev. Those of you who were as crazy as I was 20 years ago will have fond memories of Lev, who wrote a column for the now defunct Moonie paper the New York City Tribune. His message was that the West was being undermined by the congenital stupidity of her liberal elites (i.e., the New York Times) and in consequence was losing the arms race and would inevitably lose the Cold War.

Maybe Lev was right, but he never quite got the hang of America. He used to wear an especially absurd hat in winter and insist that it was the envy of ordinary Americans. How so? According to Lev, a truck driver had once called out to him: "Hey, buddy: nice hat."

Andrei was much more hip to the ways of Gotham and warned me that the title I had chosen for the new paper--the New York American--might be misunderstood. "I mean," he said, "Why not just call it the New York Anti-Semite?"

I decided to stick with the title, but as history records, I did not make it in New York. Peter Brimelow listened to me politely, and so did Wick Allison, then publisher of National Review, now a "Conservative for Obama." I had approached John O'Sullivan, too, but did not see him on that trip. Did I write to Midge Decter? Do you know, I think I did.

Many years later, Conrad Black had roughly the same idea, plus some spare change, and started the short-lived New York Sun. Much as I like Lord Black, I have never greatly cared for his politics, and the Sun was a bit shrill for my tastes. Besides--and sometimes I can scarcely believe this--I now actually like the New York Times. The headlines that once made me sneer--"In Swiss elections, little excitement"--now make me cheer. Any newspaper that ignores the imperatives of journalism and instead tells the truth deserves our thanks. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In These Times
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.