No Crisis for Takeaways; What Would You like with Your Economic Melt-Down? Good Food, Nutritionist Hopes

Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia), March 10, 2009 | Go to article overview

No Crisis for Takeaways; What Would You like with Your Economic Melt-Down? Good Food, Nutritionist Hopes


Byline: JANINE HILL

WHEN the going gets tough, the tough get - hungry, apparently.

Companies are in credit crisis, profits are down, jobs are being lost, yet the takeaway food business is doing well. Very well, it seems.

In the last two months, McDonald's has recorded record sales and KFC has announced it will pour millions into expanding its outlets.

Time will tell if our downsized economies lead to supersized waistlines, but the current fast-food fad is certainly a source of frustration for Sunshine Coast dietician Bridget-Jane Thompson, of New Leaf Nutrition.

"I'm really, really disappointed that people feel they have to resort to these types of foods," she said.

"People know what they need to be eating but they fail to heed that message."

So why are we less likely to do what we know is good for us when times are tough?

If you follow Bridget-Jane's theories, we're suffering from information overload.

Most of it is depressing, and we're so busy struggling to cope with it all, our resolve is weakened to the point where we choose easy options.

In the case of food, that tends to be products laden with fat and sugar.

For the sake of having a more positive outlook on life, Bridget-Jane herself has given up watching the news on television.

"Look what's in the news at the moment. It's all doom and gloom. It's quite hard. I prefer not to focus on the news," she said.

"In terms of the economic crisis, it's not something that I notice because it's not something I focus on. …

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