Ten Steps for Communicators to Boost Organizational Diversity

By Kunigis, Allan | Communication World, April-May 1997 | Go to article overview

Ten Steps for Communicators to Boost Organizational Diversity


Kunigis, Allan, Communication World


If there was ever any doubt that work-force diversity is a critical business issue with serious, bottom-line consequences, the Texaco lawsuit has erased those doubts forever.

But, a well-publicized racial discrimination lawsuit - and associated boycott - is just one extreme example of how your organization can be hurt if it isn't actively working to manage and leverage work-force diversity.

Other organizational costs could include depressed employee morale and loyalty, increased turnover and poor productivity. On the other hand, if managed well, a diverse work force can boost productivity and creativity, increase market share and make your organization more responsive to diverse markets.

Communicator's Role Critical

We often read about how communicators must actively shape organizational policies - not just report, react and respond.

Diversity is an excellent example. We should be shaping messages and keeping diversity at the forefront of the minds of executives, middle managers and rank-and-file employees. This will make our organizations stronger, healthier and better able to take on the challenges of the next century.

Ten Action Steps You Can Take To Be more Effective:

1) Spend time reading and learning about work-force diversity and how it affects bottom-line success. Attend an awareness-raising session if your company holds one.

2) Partner with diversity officers. Help them sell their business cases to key executives to get the essential top-level buy in. And, help craft a clear, consistent message to the mass audience.

3) Tie diversity into bottom-line corporate strategic issues. Managing diversity is both the right thing and the smart thing to do. But for your diversity effort to succeed, it must be seen as inseparable from strategic issues. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ten Steps for Communicators to Boost Organizational Diversity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.