Online News Photo Sources: Illustrating Your Web Site

By Salgado, Robert J. | Editor & Publisher, June 14, 1997 | Go to article overview

Online News Photo Sources: Illustrating Your Web Site


Salgado, Robert J., Editor & Publisher


Illustrating Your Web Site

As photos become increasingly important for media Web site operators, a growing number of traditional news-photo agencies are making their archives directly accessible from the Internet. The trend is a good one for the agencies because it provides a new market for their wares. It's also good for Web site managers who now have the ability to quickly search out and down-load appropriate images for their breaking news stories or illustrated backgrounders.

The Associated Press as well as other conventional sources for news photos, such as Presslink, NewsCom, Archive Photos, the Wieck Photo Database and Scripps Howard, are all on the Internet. And the photos from other news services, like Reuters, AFP, The New York Times and The Washington Post-Los Angeles Times are available at many of these same sites.

Also available on the Internet are photos from such new entities as Corbis, Picture Network International, Muse and Liaison International.

The Associated Press has established a Web archive for its members (mostly newspapers, some broadcasters and a few magazines). AP/Wide World Photos, which provides photos for editorial use to magazine and book publishers, will be able to provide access to part of the AP Archive for these clients.

New Market: Web Publishers

While these sites were established to serve print or broadcast clients, only now are the needs of Web publishers being addressed. Nevertheless, the availability of photos in digital form is awesome. Corbis, owned by Microsoft's Bill Gates, alone offers one million images online, including the Bettman Archive of historical photos.

The two principal problems in the purchase of images by Web publishers are the size of the image files and provision for payment. Most of these sites are geared to dealing with subscribers who want high-resolution files.

Individual sales of low resolution files to small Web publishers have not been ruled out by any of the photo services as long as legitimacy as a publisher can be established. In some cases, however, the image may have to be delivered as a high-resolution file and reduced to lower resolution by' the user.

Though the preview files already available to customers may be the 72 dots per inch (dpi) required for Web images, the tendency is to watermark them to make any unauthorized use obvious.

Free Corporate Images

The easiest images to acquire are those provided by corporations for publicity purposes. These are free on any member of sites, with no questions asked. Next in availability are photos from stock photo houses, which serve a broad range of customers.

One stock house, West Stock, has established its own online service, Muse, and others are represented on Publishers Depot, rim by Picture Network International. Both allow selection, purchase and delivery of photos directly from the Web.

Muse appears to be the most economical, offering images for personal use for $10 and to Web publishers at $30, but its previews are watermarked and the smallest file it sells is 1.1 megabytes, or 150 dpi. Muse's online service has over 16,000 photos drawn from an archive of over one million images, according to its home page.

49 Stock Photo Agencies

Publisher's Depot, which claims 400,000 digital files, is more attuned to webmasters, offering 300 kilabyte (K) files for 72 dpi display available for as little as $50. This would be for three months editorial use on a secondary page. Home page rise would bring the fee to $100. Photos for commercial use and 12-month licenses are also available. These pictures are drawn from 49 stock photo agencies, including Magnum, Allsport, Black Star, Contact Press and AllStock.

And then there is Corbis. It allows you to look at images, but then you must phone or fax for a free membership with a credit card number. then wait a day for approval before purchase. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Online News Photo Sources: Illustrating Your Web Site
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.