Knights Rescue Princes and Fight Evil Rock Trolls

Coffs Coast Advocate (Coffs Harbour, Australia), February 7, 2009 | Go to article overview

Knights Rescue Princes and Fight Evil Rock Trolls


THE Knight Club, a popular after-school club for kids, is a club with a real difference. It was bought to Coffs by Colin Phillips, who was concerned by the lack of exercise and use of imagination kids today have.

"Years ago, most children came home from school and played outside with their friends, often pretending to be cowboys or knights.

"Today, they don't seem to utilise imagination as it is all done for them in creative computer games," Colin said.

"Although fascinating and wonderful in small doses, these games can rob kids of exercise, fresh air, imagination and social interaction."

Colin wanted to create a games club for kids that gave them plenty of exercise, social skills and imaginative role playing which is often missing in their lives today.

"The Knight Club gives them all this and it teaches aspects of medieval history and basic lifestyle codes of chivalry such as respect for others, working as a team, problem solving, discipline and courtesy."

The club uses a points system of rewards for good behavior, helping at home, completing school homework, winning games etc. Those points can be used like money to purchase things from the Knight Club's trading post.

"Parents have reported amazing changes in their children's behavior and their willingness to help at home, as a result of the points system."

The Knight Club program is based on medieval knights training program - teaching basic sword skills using safe foam swords and realistic soft latex fantasy swords. …

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