Logger's Free Lunch: When Will Big Timber Get off the Dole?

By Bergman, B. J. | Sierra, July-August 1997 | Go to article overview

Logger's Free Lunch: When Will Big Timber Get off the Dole?


Bergman, B. J., Sierra


Were John Muir and Adam Smith to rise from their graves, the state of 20th-century logging would likely plunge them both into deepest Scottish gloom. Modern-day timber barons routinely pillage our national forests in the name of quarterly profits, exploiting sweetheart leases that amount to federal giveaways. Greedy for new frontiers (having reduced the old ones to stumps), they dispatch logging crews to bulldoze roads into virgin forests, wrecking fish and wildlife habitat as they go. To top it all off, this orgy of roadbuilding (377,000 miles and counting) is subsidized by the forests' real owners--U.S. taxpayers--either in hard cash or in the form of credits, which allow still more logging.

Environmentalists have long criticized roadbuilding subsidies as a singularly destructive form of corporate welfare. Often built in steep, remote terrain, logging roads leave in their wake heavy soil erosion, which increases the frequency and severity of mudslides and floods, and degrades water quality and fish habitat. Roads are also a leading cause of forest fragmentation, one of the deadliest threats to wildlife.

But now environmentalists are finding a surprising new ally in fiscal conservatives, including some whose interest in things green has seldom extended to conservation. These deficit hawks don't see why clearcutters should collect $50 million a year in entitlements as reward for taking publicly owned trees. The hawk squawking the loudest is Congressman John Kasich, the rock-ribbed Ohio Republican who heads the House Budget Committee.

Kasich, said to be mulling a bid for the White House in 2000, is hoisting the banner of the Stop Corporate Welfare Coalition, which aims to trim more than $11 billion in what wags have christened AFDC, or Aid For Dependent Corporations. The group, a patchwork of fiscal watchdogs and left-leaning reformers, has put forest-road subsidies at the top of its hit list. President Clinton seems to have noticed: his 1998 budget proposal would eliminate Forest Service credits for roadbuilding.

"Last year we had support from a few fiscal conservatives," notes John Leary, a forest-policy specialist in the Sierra Club's Washington, D. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Logger's Free Lunch: When Will Big Timber Get off the Dole?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.