Keeping Up Public Appearances: Master the Fine Art of Public-Speaking and Give a Great Presentation Every Time

By Arthur, Audrey | Black Enterprise, July 1997 | Go to article overview

Keeping Up Public Appearances: Master the Fine Art of Public-Speaking and Give a Great Presentation Every Time


Arthur, Audrey, Black Enterprise


You've worked hard and your boss is so impressed that you've been chosen to make a quarterly presentation before your peers and company higher-ups. What do you do next?

"To be a strong presenter you have to give your audience something they didn't have before they walked through the door," says Janice Powell-Rollins, director of public policy at U S West Inc. in Denver, who makes frequent presentations to government and business leaders.

Presentation skills are vital for the simple fact that more organizations are having meetings and conferences. Two hundred corporations and associations responding to a recent Meeting Professionals International/National Speakers Association survey estimated they would plan more than 7,600 meetings in 1996-97, consisting of training seminars, sales meetings, professional/technical seminars, management/board meetings and conventions/trades shows. Patricia Ball, president of the National Speakers Association and author of Straight Talk Is More Than Words (Knox Publishing; $20), says an effective presentation has these elements:

* An attention grabbing opener.

* Good content interspersed with humor and anecdotes that relate to the presentation's main point(s).

* A closing that is hard-hitting, inspirational or a call to action.

* Strong delivery skills--vocal variety, movement techniques, gestures, facial expressions, believability and passion.

Gather twice as much information as you think you'll need, and use the most interesting and dynamic points. Research your audience as well to determine the key players and their levels of expertise. Ask yourself:

Will there be any strong advocates or dissenters? Why is this audience coming together to hear you? What information can you give that they don't already know?

With research completed, work should begin on content, which represents 80% of your presentation. It's essential that this portion of the presentation flow--with the theme or main point emphasized at the beginning. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Keeping Up Public Appearances: Master the Fine Art of Public-Speaking and Give a Great Presentation Every Time
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.