Bristol's Judaica Project

By Aldous, Tony | History Today, July 1997 | Go to article overview

Bristol's Judaica Project


Aldous, Tony, History Today


Earlier this year Bristol's new Architecture Centre on Narrow Quay played host to a fascinating exhibition of photographs of Historic Synagogues of the World. It came from New York, and this was one of only two British showings. So why Bristol? An explanatory leaflet told visitors that sponsors included both the city's Orthodox and Progressive communities and marked the start of a National Lottery application to create a South West Centre for Jewish Arts and Heritage: the Judaica Project.

All this reflects a notable reawakening to the long history of the Jews in Bristol. One reason is the discovery of a ritual bath or mikvah which archaeologists have recently dated at around 1170, making it the oldest surviving mikvah in Europe. The evidence of this was hidden behind the masonry of a named head at the significantly named Jacob's Well Road which runs from Clifton down to the quays of the city's quaintly named Floating Harbour. On the hillside just opposite is the site of an ancient Jewish cemetery.

Jews first arrived in England after the Norman Conquest. brought in by William the Conqueror to provide financial services from which a Dan on usury barred Christians. They seem to have arrived in Bristol during the following reign when William Rufus continued a policy of encouragement. They serried as was common wen medieval Jewish communities) outside the city walls, but along side the River Frame: the present Nelson and Quay Streets were once called Jewry Lane.

Though banking skills may have brought the Bristol Jews prosperity, their lot was often unenviable. R.R. Emanuel and M.W. Ponsford, writing in the transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, explain mat Jews were regarded as the King's chattels. taxable at will under the Bristol Tallage of 1213 the crown confiscated one-third of all Jewish property. Three ,ears earlier the merchant Abraham refused to contribute to a royal levy introduced by King John to finance his Irish wars. Abraham was Imprisoned in Bristol Castle and his teeth pulled out, one each day, until -- down to the last of his eight teeth -- he paid up the princely sum of 10,000 marks.

In some respects, however, Bristol S Jews may have received more tolerant treatment than in many other places Their first synagogue seems to have been in vaults directly under the church of St Giles; this, like the still surviving St John's, was built into the city wall with a defensive gateway under its tower. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bristol's Judaica Project
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.