Don Plays Part in City's History

The Queensland Times (Ipswich, Australia), November 29, 2008 | Go to article overview

Don Plays Part in City's History


Donald Keith Faulkner

Born: Warwick, February 20, 1921

Died: Boonah, November 21, 2008

LIKE his batting partner and great friend Kev Laimer, Don Faulkner's life was filled with family, sport, business and community service.

Mr Faulkner died last Friday, two days before Mr Laimer, who made his name with Laimer's Menswear in Brisbane Street.

Mr Faulkner was the second youngest of John (Jack) and Evelyn Faulkner's six children - all the other children were girls.

He went to Blair State School then St Edmund's where the headmaster, Brother Schofield, was a strong disciplinarian.

His Catholic schooling and his mother's guidance strongly influenced his life and he remained a devout Catholic.

After he left school in 1936 Mr Faulkner started an apprenticeship as a motor mechanic with Eagers in Brisbane.

His father Jack was a close friend of Eagers founder Sir George Green.

Shortly before the start of World War II, Mr Faulkner joined the light horse brigade.

He told his family that for the first two weeks all he did was feed the horses and learn about animal husbandry.

He entered the army as a private and worked his way up to Warrant Officer but was one of the only men in his unit not sent overseas.

It was terribly disappointing for him because he wanted to play his part in active duty. …

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