Long Ride for Club Stalwart

Gympie Times, The Qld., November 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Long Ride for Club Stalwart


Well before pony clubs existed in Queensland, Percy Bishop was saddling up a pony and heading to school.

Percy was born into a world of horses and his long association with them has filled his life with many wonderful memories.

"Horses were a big part of my life right from the start," Percy says. And at every stage of his life, even when he and his associates were building up Queensland Livestock Company, there was a horse never too far away.

"I had a lovely chestnut mare stabled in the backyard of the Imperial Hotel. I lived in the Imperial for two years in the early days of the agency," he recalled.

Percy is treasured by all who have known him for his enduring commitment to encouraging horsemanship at many levels but particularly his dedication to Gympie and District Pony Club. On Saturday, November 15, at the Gympie Civic Centre, the pony club celebrates its golden anniversary and right from its inception Percy played an integral role in its initial establishment and growth.

Founded in 1958, Gympie Pony Club was one of a handful of clubs established prior to the formation of the Pony Club Association of Queensland (PCAQ). Percy was on the first PCAQ committee and involved in the selection and training of pony club instructors throughout Queensland. He was state deputy instructor for many years, becoming state chief instructor upon the passing of Ned Twohill.

"I didn't plan on getting as deeply involved," Percy said with a wry smile.

There were about 40 members in the club's early days and with few if any horse floats, most members rode to rally days. Heading to gymkhanas meant enlisting a local cattle carrier and loading everyone's horses onto the truck and heading off: you left in the dark and you got back in the dark - and then the kids rode home. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Long Ride for Club Stalwart
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.