NATO Gains Commitment, but Not for Afghanistan; Sarkozy Wins Parliament's Support for Troops in Integrated Command

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 23, 2009 | Go to article overview

NATO Gains Commitment, but Not for Afghanistan; Sarkozy Wins Parliament's Support for Troops in Integrated Command


Byline: Anne-Laure Buffard, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

PARIS -- French President Nicolas Sarkozy's parliamentary victory last week that will return France to NATO's integrated military command encountered fierce domestic opposition, and analysts say it is unlikely to result in a bigger French contribution to the Afghanistan war.

Afghanistan will of course be a central issue when President Obama comes to Europe in the beginning of April, said Bruno Tertrais, a research fellow at the Foundation for Strategic Research, a Paris think tank. Yet I don't think it will be a test for France's new commitment to NATO.

France has about 3,000 soldiers in Afghanistan - 700 more than a year ago - and has no plans at all to increase that deployment, said Emmanuel Lenain, a spokesman for the French Embassy in Washington. He added that there is no link between French troop levels and the reintegration to NATO's military command.

Parliament made the decision in a 329-238 vote Tuesday, four decades after President Charles de Gaulle sought to underline French independence by withdrawing from NATO's military command while remaining a political member of the alliance.

Mr. Sarkozy, however, signaled from the start of his presidency two years ago that he was ready to return France to the alliance's command structure, in part to overcome the bitterness left by the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

A state alone, a solitary nation, is a nation without influence, and if we want to count for something we have to know how to bind ourselves to allies and friendship, Mr. Sarkozy said at a recent defense seminar in Paris.

Mr. Sarkozy's comments failed to convince staunch opponents of NATO's reintegration, on both sides of the political spectrum.

No to France's return into NATO. Yes to a free France, read signs in Parisian streets posted before the parliamentary vote. The motto came from Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, a Gaullist member of the National Assembly.

Nicolas Sarkozy's furious energy to subordinate our country to the United States means he has given up France's willingness and ability to exercise self-determination on the international stage, Mr. Dupont-Aignan said on his Web site.

Once a member of the center-right presidential party, the Union for a Popular Movement (UMP), and now president of his own sovereignist group, Mr. Dupont-Aignan was one of several rightist officials - including two former prime ministers - expressing fierce opposition to Mr. Sarkozy's plan.

Dominique de Villepin and Alain Juppe, former UMP prime ministers, publicly expressed their concern about the decision, which they said was a betrayal of the Gaullist legacy.

Mr. de Villepin described the decision as a serious diplomatic mistake.

Illustrating the divide within the presidential majority, a dozen right-wing deputies boycotted Tuesday's vote.

The debate is impossible in the Parliament and is reduced to almost nothing within the majority, Francois Goulard, a member of the UMP who skipped the vote, told The Washington Times. The French government is twisting our arm on the issue.

To deter rightist deputies from voting against the measure, Prime Minister Francois Fillon suggested that a negative vote would threaten to bring down the government. That apparently accounted for the relatively wide majority with which it passed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

NATO Gains Commitment, but Not for Afghanistan; Sarkozy Wins Parliament's Support for Troops in Integrated Command
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.