Barack Obama: America's 'First Global' President

By Zogby, John | Politics Magazine, March 2009 | Go to article overview

Barack Obama: America's 'First Global' President


Zogby, John, Politics Magazine


President Barack Obama was born in 1961, which places him at the tail end of the Baby Boom.

He may be 47, but in outlook Obama has much more in common with America's 18- to 29-year-olds, a group I call the First Global Citizens.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Zogby International polling has consistently found that young adults have more outward-looking and accepting attitudes. Beginning in their teens or earlier, their lives have been wired to their friends and to the whole world. You need look no further than Obama's affinity to his BlackBerry to see that Obama and the First Globals have much in common. But it goes beyond having a smart phone.

Obama has been described by some as post-racial. That description to a large degree fits many in the 18 to 29 set.

One of our Zogby writers was watching the inauguration with his son Matthew, age 20. After hearing one too many times that Obama's election was the fulfillment of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "dream," Matthew snarled at the screen that "King's dream won't be realized until you all stop talking about the fact that Obama is black." The message was clear: Race shouldn't matter.

An August 2008 Zogby Interactive survey found First Globals were more likely than other age group to believe that Sen. John McCain's campaign "was trying to indirectly use race as an issue against Barack Obama." They were also less likely to believe that Obama "wants people to believe that some criticisms of him are based on his race."

Obama has obviously thought a great deal about race--but like the First Globals, though, he acknowledges race but avoids dwelling on it. I anticipate the race issue will diminish as the nation gets more comfortable with Obama as its leader, and as the First Globals are followed by the next wave of young adults, who will be even more accustomed to a multi-racial society.

The signals from Obama could not be clearer that U.S. foreign policy will be more about cooperation than confrontation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Barack Obama: America's 'First Global' President
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.